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Tuesday July 7, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Banjos, Bones, and Ballads Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sandy Allgood   744-3352   
    Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.
    Location: Minot-Sleeper Library, 35 Pleasant St., Bristol
 
misc_none 6:30 PM Family Stories: How and Why to Remember and Tell Them Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Brianna Sullivan   382-6011   
    Telling personal and family stories is fun - and much more. Storytelling connects strangers, strengthens links between generations, and gives children the self-knowledge to carry them through hard times. Knowledge of family history has even been linked to better teen behavior and mental health. In this active and interactive program, storyteller Jo Radner shares foolproof ways to mine memories and interview relatives for meaningful stories. Participants practices finding, developing, and telling their own tales.
    Location: Plaistow Public Library, 85 Main St., Plaistow
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Cannon Shenanigans and New Hampshire's Muster Day Tradition Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jan Phillips   279-4617   
    New Hampshire's Muster Day tradition ended in 1850, as did some of the related localized rivalries that involved the stealing of cannons. Muster Day was a day of drills, marching, and sham battles for local militias in NH. This spectator event was accompanied by entertainers, vendors, gamblers, and a great deal of alcohol. Throughout 19th century NH, demand for cannons for Fourth of July, election celebrations, demonstrations of civic pride, and for the sheer cussedness of making noise, often exceeded supply. Various town and regional rivalries sprang up over the possession of particular cannons and were constant headaches for local authorities. Jack Noon will explore the vestiges of this tradition that survived well into the 20th century.
    Location: Meredith Historical Museum, 45 Main St., Meredith
Wednesday July 8, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:30 PM Banjos, Bones, and Ballads Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Holderness Library   968-7066   
    Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.
    Location: Holderness Historical Society, Rte 3 (Curry Place behind Post Office), Holderness
Thursday July 9, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 2:30 PM Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sue Belanger   229-1266   
    Through architecture unique to northern New England, this illustrated talk focuses on several case studies that show how farmers converted their typical separate house and barns into connected farmsteads. Thomas Hubka's research in his award-winning book, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, demonstrates that average farmers were, in fact, motivated by competition with farmers in other regions of America, who had better soils and growing seasons and fewer rocks to clear. The connected farmstead organization, housing equal parts mixed-farming and home-industry, was one of the collective responses to the competitive threat.
    Location: Tad's Place, Heritage Heights, 149 E. Side Dr., Concord
 
misc_none 7:00 PM I Can't Die But Once - Harriet Tubman's Civil War Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Ruslyn Vear   673-2288   
    Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti's characterization of Harriet Tubman is a lucid, well-researched biography about the remarkable life of an enduring warrior. As Harriet Tubman, she weaves a tale of truth, pain, courage and determination in the quagmire of racial exploitation. The United States Government enlisted Tubman as a scout and spy for the Union cause and she battled courageously behind enemy lines during the Civil War, but Tubman is best known for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad. Though she is one of the most famous women in our nation's history, we have come to know her life through fictionalized biographies written for school children. Quezaire-Presutti separates reality from myth to reconstruct a richer and far more accurate historical account of Tubman's life.
    Location: Amherst Town Library, 14 Main St., Amherst
 
misc_none 7:30 PM New England's Colonial Meetinghouses and their Impact on American Society Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Lisa Rothman   487-3867   
    New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities. Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.
    Location: New Boston Community Church, 2 Meetinghouse Hill Rd., New Boston
Saturday July 11, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 1:00 PM The Founding Fathers: What Were They Thinking? Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Claire James   938-2041   
    In 1787 delegates gathered in Philadelphia to address a wide variety of crises facing the young United States of America and produced a charter for a new government. In modern times, competing political and legal claims are frequently based on what those delegates intended. Mythology about the founders and their work at the 1787 Convention has obscured both fact and legitimate analysis of the events leading to the agreement called the Constitution. Richard Hesse explores the cast of characters called "founders," the problems they faced, and the solutions they fashioned. PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE OF DATE FROM JUNE 20TH TO JULY 11TH.
    Location: The Tin Shop, 160 East Main St., Bradford
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Contra Dancing In New Hampshire: Then and Now Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Kathy Bashaw   763-4289   
    Since the late 1600s, the lively tradition of contra dancing has kept people of all ages swinging and sashaying in barns, town halls and schools around the state. Contra dancing came to New Hampshire by way of the English colonists and remains popular in many communities, particularly in the Monadnock Region. Presenter Dudley Laufman brings this tradition to life with stories, poems and recordings of callers, musicians, and dancers, past and present. Live music, always integral to this dance form, will be played on the fiddle and melodeon. Willing audience members may be invited to dance the Virginia Reel!THIS EVENT IS PART OF NEWBURY'S OLD HOME DAY. AFTER DUDLEY'S PRESENTATION, ATTENDEES WILL CROSS THE ROAD TO THE VETERAN'S HALL AND HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO DO SOME OF THE DANCES THAT THEY HAVE JUST HEARD ABOUT.
    Location: Center Meeting House, 927 Rte. 103 (intersection of Rte 103 & Rte 103A), Newbury
Tuesday July 14, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM Music in my Pockets: Family Fun in Folk Music Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Tasha Leroux Stetson   364-2400   
    Singing games, accessible "pocket instruments" like spoons and dancing puppets, tall tales, funny songs, old songs and songs kids teach each other in the playground are all traditional in that they have been passed down the generations by word of mouth. They will all be seen, heard and learned as Jeff Warner visits 1850 or 1910 in a New England town, with families gathered around the figurative hearth, participating in timeless, hearty entertainment and, almost without the audience knowing it, teaches how America amused itself before electricity.
    Location: Gilmanton Year-Round Library, 1385 NH Rte. 140, Gilmanton Iron Works
 
misc_none 6:30 PM A Soldier's Mother Tells Her Story Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jackie Cote   863-3105   
    Speaking as Betsey Phelps, the mother of a Union soldier from Amherst, New Hampshire who died heroically at the Battle of Gettysburg, Sharon Wood offers an informative and sensitive reflection on that sacrifice from a mother's perspective. Wood blends the Phelps boy's story with those of other men who left their New Hampshire homes to fight for the Union cause and of the families who supported them on the home front.
    Location: Richards Free Library, 58 North Main St., Newport
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Roger Warren   787-2446   
    Through architecture unique to northern New England, this illustrated talk focuses on several case studies that show how farmers converted their typical separate house and barns into connected farmsteads. Thomas Hubka's research in his award-winning book, Big House, Little House, Back House, Barn: The Connected Farm Buildings of New England, demonstrates that average farmers were, in fact, motivated by competition with farmers in other regions of America, who had better soils and growing seasons and fewer rocks to clear. The connected farmstead organization, housing equal parts mixed-farming and home-industry, was one of the collective responses to the competitive threat.
    Location: Alumni Hall, 75 Court St., Haverhill
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misc_none 7:00 PM Comics in World History and Cultures Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Merrimack Public Library (Adult Services)   424-5021   
    Marek Bennett presents a whirlwind survey of comics from around the world and throughout history, with special attention to what these vibrant narratives tell (and show) us about the people and periods that created them. Bennett engages and involves the audience in an interactive discussion of several sample comics representing cultures such as Ancient Rome, Medieval Europe, the Ancient Maya, Feudal and modern Japan, the United States in the early 20th century, and Nazi Germany during World War II. The program explores the various ways of creating and reading comics from around the world, and what these techniques tell us about the cultures in which they occur.
    Location: Merrimack Public Library, 470 Daniel Webster Hwy, Merrimack
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Crosscut: The Mills, Logging and Life on the Androscoggin Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Beverly Glynn   893-8882   
    Using oral histories, Rebecca Rule recreates the voices of North Country people and uses new and vintage photos to tell the story of logging, the Berlin Mills, and life in the Androscoggin Valley, from the beginnings of the logging industry in the 1800s, through the boom years of the Brown Company and subsequent mill owners, and on to the demolition of the stacks in 2007. Audience members will be invited to share their own stories and discuss the logging and paper industries and the special place north of the notches. John Rule assists with a PowerPoint presentation of photos and information from his own research into the history of the Brown Company as an archivist at the New Hampshire Historical Society.
    Location: Salem Historical Museum, 310 Main St., Salem
 
misc_none 7:00 PM On This Spot Once Stood... Remembering the Architectural Heritage of New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Franconia Area Museum   823-5977   
    New Hampshire has lost many of its important historic buildings to fire, neglect, intentional demolition and re-development. In some cases, a plaque or marker provides a physical reminder of what was, but in other examples, no tangible evidence remains. Maggie Stier showcases some of the celebrated buildings that New Hampshire has lost, and explores how and why we remember and commemorate those losses. Her program will draw from historical and contemporary photographs, maps, and other historical records to explore the significance of these structures, explain their eventual fate, and analyze popular responses to the loss. Particular attention will be devoted to places where a building was memorialized in some way. Examples in this illustrated talk will include the simple wooden signs where the hotels in Bethlehem once stood, a large-scale installation of architectural fragments in Concord, and the birthplaces of several notable citizens. Audiences will be challenged to think about other examples, and consider the ways in which we remember what isn't there any longer.
    Location: Abbie Greenleaf Library, 439 Main St., Franconia
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Treasure from the Isles of Shoals: How New Archaeology is Changing Old History Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: David Ruell   968-7716   
    There is treasure here but not the pirate kind. Scientific "digs" on Smuttynose Island are changing New England history. Archaeologist Nathan Hamilton has unearthed 300,000 artifacts to date on this largely uninhabited rock at the Isles of Shoals. Evidence proves prehistoric Native Americans hunted New Hampshire's only offshore islands 6,000 years ago. Hundreds of European fishermen split, salted, and dried valuable Atlantic cod here from the 1620s. "King Haley" ruled a survivalist kingdom here before Thomas Laighton struck tourist gold when his family took over the region's first hotel on Smuttynose. Laighton's daughter Celia Thaxter spun poetic tales of ghosts and pirates. J. Dennis Robinson, a longtime Smuttynose steward, explores the truth behind the romantic legends of Gosport Harbor in this colorful show-and-tell presentation.
    Location: Ashland Railroad Station Museum, 69 Depot St., Ashland
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Vanished Veterans - NH's Civil War Monuments and Memorials Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carol Eyman   589-4610   
    From Seabrook to Colebrook, Berlin to Hinsdale, New Hampshire's towns, individuals and veterans organizations erected a fascinating assortment of memorials to The War of the Rebellion. Beginning with obelisks of the 1860s and continuing to re-mastered works of the 21st century, historian George Morrison presents a diverse selection of New Hampshire's commemorations.
    Location: Nashua Public Library, 2 Court St., Nashua
Wednesday July 15, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM World War Two New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Darrell Eifert   926-3368   
    This documentary tells the story of life in New Hampshire during the Second World War. Through interviews, historic news film, photos, and radio reports from the battlefields, this documentary and discussion facilitated by John Gfroerer chronicles how a nation, a state, and the citizens of New Hampshire mobilized for war.
    Location: Lane Memorial Library, 2 Academy Ave., Hampton
 
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: David Trook   539-1051   
    Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.
    Location: Freedom Town Hall, 12 Elm St., Freedom
 
misc_none 7:00 PM The Ballad Lives! Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Patricia Barry   838-2451   
    Murder and mayhem, robbery and rapine, love that cuts to the bone: American ballads re-tell the wrenching themes of their English and Scottish cousins. Transplanted in the new world by old world immigrants, the traditional story-song of the Anglos and Scots wound up reinvigorated in the mountains of Appalachia and along the Canadian border. John Perrault talks, sings, and picks the strings that bind the old ballads to the new.
    Location: Shared Ministry White Church, 49 S. Main St., Lisbon
Thursday July 16, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Four Centuries of Fishing in NH: Yankee Character, Yankee Priorities Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Lake Sunapee Protective Association   763-2210   
    Fishing history in New Hampshire runs the gamut of nets, spears, guns, clubs, weirs, seines, fish pots, and hooks. Overfishing, inadequate, or unenforced fishing regulations, and dams ended the once enormous spawning runs of salmon, shad, and other sea-run fish up from the ocean. The Yankee tinkering and tampering instinct, coupled with confidence in new technologies and the rise of sport fishing brought many new fish species to NH after the Civil War, often with unforeseen results. Short-term economic self-interest and environmental/economic compromises seem to have taken priority over long term natural resource health, resulting in a tailspin of environmental degradation. Jack Noon's presentation illustrates these complex changes.
    Location: Lake Sunapee Protective Assoication, 63 Main St., Sunapee
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Homer's Odysseus Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Wolfeboro Public Library   569-2428   
    Using the well known scenes of Homer's Odyssey, Sebastian Lockwood delivers the passion and intensity of the great epic that deserves to be heard told as it was by Bards in the days of old. Lockwood says, "The best compliment is when a ten-year-old comes up and says, 'I felt like I was there.'" That is the magic of the performance that takes students and adults alike back into the text.
    Location: Wolfeboro Public Library, 259 S. Main St., Wolfeboro
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Rudyard Kipling Revisited Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Mariposa Museum   924-4555   
    Rudyard Kipling was the most internationally celebrated author of his day. The first four years of his marriage and fatherhood were spent in New England where he built his dream house - Naulakha in Dummerston, Vermont - now preserved as a Landmark Trust property. It was there that he penned The Jungle Book and other classics. These were productive and happy years for the young literary giant, but eventually deeply troubled. Although Kipling was an intensely private individual, Jackson Gillman's sensitive portrayal provides an inside look at the writer's experience in New England and some of the controversy surrounding this complex man. Part lecture, part living history, part storytelling, Jackson's presentation includes a selection of the classic Just So Stories. This program is part of the Mariposa's series: Renewing Energies - Fairy Tales, Heros, and the Wisdom of Stories.
    Location: Mariposa Museum, 26 Main St., Peterborough
Monday July 20, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Lizzie Borden Took an Axe, Or Did She? Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sherry Bailey   432-6140   
    In 1892 Lizzie Borden, a 32-year-old single woman, was officially charged with the murder of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. The events that followed the murder would stir the curiosity of people across the nation. After four official criminal proceedings, Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the murder but the case was not officially reinvestigated by the authorities. To this day the case of Lizzie Borden is a mystery that has inspired television movies, documentaries, cinematic offerings, plays, musicals, poems, websites, blogs, a scholarly journal, college courses, and law school case studies. Annette Holba reviews the facts of the case and explores the evidence that some experts suggest points to Lizzie's guilt and others believe points to Lizzie's innocence. Lizzie's connections to New Hampshire are also discussed.
    Location: Derry Public Library, 64 East Broadway, Derry
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misc_none 7:00 PM On This Spot Once Stood... Remembering the Architectural Heritage of New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Charles North   934-6693   
    New Hampshire has lost many of its important historic buildings to fire, neglect, intentional demolition and re-development. In some cases, a plaque or marker provides a physical reminder of what was, but in other examples, no tangible evidence remains. Maggie Stier showcases some of the celebrated buildings that New Hampshire has lost, and explores how and why we remember and commemorate those losses. Her program will draw from historical and contemporary photographs, maps, and other historical records to explore the significance of these structures, explain their eventual fate, and analyze popular responses to the loss. Particular attention will be devoted to places where a building was memorialized in some way. Examples in this illustrated talk will include the simple wooden signs where the hotels in Bethlehem once stood, a large-scale installation of architectural fragments in Concord, and the birthplaces of several notable citizens. Audiences will be challenged to think about other examples, and consider the ways in which we remember what isn't there any longer.
    Location: Northfield Town Hall, 21 Summer St., Northfield
 
misc_none 7:00 PM The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Traveling Entertainer Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Nancy Mardin   536-3982   
    Musical humorist Charles Ross Taggart grew up in Topsham, Vermont, going on to perform in various lyceum and Chautauqua circuits all across the country for over 40 years starting in 1895. A fiddler, piano player, comedian, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 40 recordings on various labels, as well as appearing in an early talking movie four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of Taggart's career, c. 1936, sharing recollections on his life, with some live fiddling and humorous sketches interspersed in this living history program.
    Location: Campton Historical Society, Rte. 175, Campton
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Wild and Colorful: Victorian Architecture in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Laconia Historical & Museum   527-1278   
    Visually explore the tremendous legacy of New Hampshire's architecture from the Victorian period (1820 - 1914). This program looks at exuberant Victorian-era architecture across the state in houses, hotels, mills, city halls, courthouses, and churches, with references to gardens, furniture, and other elements of the built environment. Richard Guy Wilson explores elements of visual literacy and points out how architecture can reflect the cultural and civic values of its time and place.
    Location: Laconia Public Library, 695 North Main St., Laconia
Tuesday July 21, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM (Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Meredith Public Library   279-4303   
    The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan's presentation explores the origins of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.
    Location: Meredith Public Library, 91 Main St., Meredith
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Mary Todd Lincoln: Wife and Widow Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Gilman Library   875-2550   
    Living historian Sally Mummey portrays Mary Todd Lincoln as she muses on her life from her dreams as a girl to her years as First Lady during the Civil War. Mrs. Lincoln shares stories of her life with President Lincoln and the events of that evening in Ford's Theatre when the assassin's bullet not only changed the course of the nation but destroyed her life as well. From the opulence of the White House to the dregs of obscurity, Mrs. Lincoln lived out her life struggling with affliction and tragedy. With wit and heartbreak, seasoned with abiding love for her husband and her children, Mrs. Lincoln reveals the passionate humanity of a misunderstood woman.
    Location: Gilman Library, 100 Main Street, Alton
 
misc_none 7:00 PM New England's Colonial Meetinghouses and their Impact on American Society Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Cindy Spencer   539-4769   
    New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities. Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.
    Location: Historical Carroll County Courthouse, 20 Courthouse Sq., Ossipee
Wednesday July 22, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jackie Rollins   544-3252   
    Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape. Such a project can help landowners know what to do if they have archaeological sites on their land and help stimulate interest in a town's future through its past.
    Location: Tuftonboro Historical Society, 449 GW Hwy (Rte. 109), Melvin Village
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Digging Into Native History in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Melanie Benton   366-5950   
    Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth's surface.
    Location: Lake Winnepesaukee Museum, 503 Endicott St. North, Laconia
 
misc_none 7:30 PM Saving the Mountains: NH & the Creation of the National Forests Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Linda Foerderer   968-7487   
    New Hampshire's White Mountains played a leading role in events leading to the Weeks Act, the law that created the eastern national forests. Focusing on Concord's Joseph B. Walker and the Forest Society's Philip Ayres, Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores the relationship between our mountains and the economic, environmental and aesthetic questions posed by the individuals involved in the creation of the National Forest.
    Location: Holderness Historical Society, Rte 3 (Curry Place), Holderness
Thursday July 23, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Lizzie Borden Took an Axe, Or Did She? Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sloane Jarell   367-8545   
    In 1892 Lizzie Borden, a 32-year-old single woman, was officially charged with the murder of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. The events that followed the murder would stir the curiosity of people across the nation. After four official criminal proceedings, Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the murder but the case was not officially reinvestigated by the authorities. To this day the case of Lizzie Borden is a mystery that has inspired television movies, documentaries, cinematic offerings, plays, musicals, poems, websites, blogs, a scholarly journal, college courses, and law school case studies. Annette Holba reviews the facts of the case and explores the evidence that some experts suggest points to Lizzie's guilt and others believe points to Lizzie's innocence. Lizzie's connections to New Hampshire are also discussed.
    Location: Madison Library, 1895 Village Rd., Madison
 
misc_none 7:00 PM The Abolitionists of Noyes Academy Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Keene Public Library   352-0157   
    In 1835, abolitionists opened one of the nation's first integrated schools in Canaan, NH, attracting eager African American students from as far away as Boston, Providence, and New York City. Outraged community leaders responded by raising a mob that dragged the academy building off its foundation and ran the African American students out of town. New Hampshire's first experiment in educational equality was brief, but it helped launch the public careers of a trio of extraordinary African American leaders: Henry Highland Garnet, Alexander Crummell, and Thomas Sipkins Sidney. Dan Billin plumbs the depths of anti-abolitionist sentiment in early-nineteenth-century New England, and the courage of three young friends destined for greatness.
    Location: Keene Public Library, 60 Winter St., Keene
Wednesday July 29, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Brewing in New Hampshire: An Informal History of Beer in the Granite State Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Bonnie Angulas   673-1353   
    Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era. Illustrations present evidence of society's changing attitudes towards beer and alcohol consumption over the years. Whether you're a beer connoisseur or a "tea-totaler", this lecture will be enjoyed by adults of all ages.
    Location: Daland Memorial Library, 5 N. Main St., Mont Vernon
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misc_none 7:00 PM New England's Colonial Meetinghouses and their Impact on American Society Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: David Countway   569-3648   
    New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities. Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture. THIS EVENT IS PART OF THE EAST ALTON MEETING HOUSE'S 200TH BIRTHDAY.
    Location: East Alton Meeting House, 347 Drew Hill Road, Alton
Friday July 31, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Comics in World History and Cultures Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Chris Hague   529-2044   
    Marek Bennett presents a whirlwind survey of comics from around the world and throughout history, with special attention to what these vibrant narratives tell (and show) us about the people and periods that created them. Bennett engages and involves the audience in an interactive discussion of several sample comics representing cultures such as Ancient Rome, Medieval Europe, the Ancient Maya, Feudal and modern Japan, the United States in the early 20th century, and Nazi Germany during World War II. The program explores the various ways of creating and reading comics from around the world, and what these techniques tell us about the cultures in which they occur.
    Location: Weare Town Hall, 16 North Stark Hwy., Weare Ctr.
Saturday August 1, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 9:30 AM Inside Russia Today Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Joan Nelson   332-6265   
    The fall of Soviet Communism in the early 1990s catapulted Russia into a new social order. Marina Forbes establishes a link between Russia's rich cultural heritage and the lives of Russians today. The "new rich," the evolving role of women, the revival of the Orthodox Church, humor, family life, entertainment, and the emphasis on consumerism are all examined as she brings personal experience and research to bear in this fascinating look at contemporary Russian life. PROGRAM IS PRECEDED BY A POTLUCK BREAKFAST BEGINNING AT 9:00AM.
    Location: Bow Lake Baptist Church, 530 Province Rd., Strafford
Monday August 3, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:30 PM Old Time Rules Will Prevail: The Fiddle Contest in New Hampshire and New England Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jim Rogers   305-8553   
    Fiddle contests evolved from endurance marathons to playing a set number of tunes judged by certain specific criteria. Whether large or small, fiddle contests tried to show who was the "best," as well as preserve old-time fiddling and raise money for local organizations. In recent years, the fiddle contest has declined significantly in New England due to cultural changes and financial viability. The greatest legacies of these contests were recordings made during live competition. A sampling of these tunes is played during the presentation, as well as some live fiddling by the presenter, Adam Boyce.
    Location: Wolfeboro Community Center, 32 Lehner St., Wolfeboro
Tuesday August 4, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM A Visit With Queen Victoria Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jan Phillips   279-4617   
    In 1837, teenaged Victoria ascended to the British throne, untrained and innocent. Those who would try to usurp her power underestimated this self-willed intelligent young woman whose mettle sustained her through her 63-year reign. Using Queen Victoria's diary and letters, this program reveals the personal details of a powerful yet humane woman, who took seriously her role as monarch in a time of great expansion. She and her husband, Albert, set an example of high moral character and dedication, a novelty in the royal house after generations of scandal. Through her children she left a royal legacy; an era bears her name. Sally Mummey performs this living history in proper 19th Century clothing resplendent with Royal Orders.
    Location: Meredith Public Library, 91 Main St., Meredith
Thursday August 6, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Vanished Veterans - NH's Civil War Monuments and Memorials Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: David Moody   835-7900   
    From Seabrook to Colebrook, Berlin to Hinsdale, New Hampshire's towns, individuals and veterans organizations erected a fascinating assortment of memorials to The War of the Rebellion. Beginning with obelisks of the 1860s and continuing to re-mastered works of the 21st century, historian George Morrison presents a diverse selection of New Hampshire's commemorations.
    Location: Third Congregational Church, 14 River St., Alstead
Saturday August 8, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 11:00 AM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Lake Winnepesaukee Museum   366-5950   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Lake Winnepesaukee Museum, 503 Endicott St. North, Laconia
Sunday August 9, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 1:30 PM A Visit with Abraham Lincoln Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Marty Cornelissen   875-5456   
    Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address." Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.
    Location: Alton Historical Society, 13 Depot St., Alton
Monday August 10, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:30 PM New Hampshire and the American Clipper Ship Era Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Tom Talpey   495-3284   
    Glenn Knoblock explores our nation's maritime past with this exciting look at the fastest sailing ships ever built in America. Learn how the clippers evolved, who built them and why, as well as New Hampshire's important role in supplying these unique ships. Though New Hampshire's coastline is only seventeen miles long, the state produced more clippers, all built at Portsmouth, than many other cities, bested only by New York and Boston. Learn also about the exciting voyages these ships made, the cargos they carried, the men and, in a few cases, the women, who sailed them, and why the ships' reign, lasting from 1844-1860, was so short. Whether you're a boating or nautical enthusiast, or simply have an interest in salt-water history, this lecture will fill your sails. POTLUCK SUPPER WILL BEGIN AT 6:00 PM. VISITORS ARE WELCOME TO BRING A DISH AND JOIN THE GATHERING.
    Location: Camp Morgan Lodge, 339 Millen Pond Rd., Washington
Tuesday August 11, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Kathy Begor   744-3335   
    Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape. Such a project can help landowners know what to do if they have archaeological sites on their land and help stimulate interest in a town's future through its past. POTLUCK BEGINS AT 5:30 PM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 6:30 PM.
    Location: Union Congregational Church (basement), 16 Church Lane, Hebron
 
misc_none 6:30 PM Wacky Songs that Made Us Laugh Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Robin Sweetser   464-3595   
    Popular songs with humorous lyrics have kept us laughing since Colonial times. We need comic relief, and songs provide some of the best (sometimes unintentionally). Excerpts from hilarious songs help chart the evolution of musical humor from the 1920s to the 1980s. Selections poke fun at WW II enemies, diets, television, sex, Christmas, summer camp, religion, and many other aspects of life. Laugh as you recall wacky moments from the past and discover new ones with Calvin Knickerbocker.
    Location: Fuller Public Library, 29 School St., Hillsboro
 
misc_none 7:00 PM The Finest Hours :The True Story Behind the U.S. Coast Guard's Most Daring Sea Rescue Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Alex Robinson   424-4044   
    On February 18, 1952, an astonishing maritime event began when a ferocious nor'easter split in half a 500-foot long oil tanker, the Pendleton, approximately one mile off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Incredibly, just twenty miles away, a second oil tanker, the Fort Mercer, also split in half. On both tankers men were trapped on the severed bows and sterns, and all four sections were sinking in 60-foot seas. Thus began a life and death drama of survival, heroism, and a series of tragic mistakes. Of the 84 seamen aboard the tankers, 70 would be rescued and 14 would lose their lives. Michael Tougias, co-author of the book and soon-to-be Disney movie The Finest Hours, uses slides to illustrate the harrowing tale of the rescue efforts amidst towering waves and blinding snow in one of the most dangerous shoals in the world.
    Location: Litchfield Middle School Cafeteria, 19 McElwain Dr., Litchfield
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Wednesday August 12, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM New Hampshire's One-Room Rural Schools: The Romance and the Reality Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Upper Valley Senior Center   448-4213   
    Hundreds of one-room schools dotted the landscape of New Hampshire a century ago and were the backbone of primary education for generations of children. Revered in literature and lore, they actually were beset with problems, some of which are little changed today. The greatest issue was financing the local school and the vast differences between taxing districts in ability to support education. Other concerns included teacher preparation and quality, curriculum, discipline, student achievement and community involvement in the educational process. Steve Taylor explores the lasting legacies of the one-room school and how they echo today.
    Location: Upper Valley Senior Ctr., 10 Campbell St., Lebanon
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Inside Russia Today Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Kate Thomas   585-6503   
    The fall of Soviet Communism in the early 1990s catapulted Russia into a new social order. Marina Forbes establishes a link between Russia's rich cultural heritage and the lives of Russians today. The "new rich," the evolving role of women, the revival of the Orthodox Church, humor, family life, entertainment, and the emphasis on consumerism are all examined as she brings personal experience and research to bear in this fascinating look at contemporary Russian life.
    Location: Fitzwilliam Town Library, 11 Templeton Tpk., Fitzwilliam
Thursday August 13, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Abraham Lincoln: From Springfield, Illinois to Exeter, New Hampshire and Beyond Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Erin Robb   239-8918   
    Lincoln's political life evolved from humble origins to culminate in the presidency of the United States and his leadership during the American Civil War. An illustrated lecture traces the crucial political years of transition from 1858 to 1861 when Lincoln became a national candidate for office and traveled widely. He came to New Hampshire to see his son Robert Todd Lincoln at Phillips Exeter Academy and while he was in NH he addressed audiences in Concord, Dover, Exeter, and Manchester. Presented by Richard D. Schubart, Phillips Exeter Academy.
    Location: Sheridan House, 391 Back Ashuelot Rd., Winchester
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Libby Museum   569-1035   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Libby Museum, 755 North Main St., Wolfeboro
Friday August 14, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Traditional Matryoshka Nested Doll Making: from Russia to New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Barbara Robarts   788-3352   
    Marina Forbes shares many examples of Matroyshka nested dolls, including examples of her own work and from her extensive collection, as she examines the rich folk tradition and symbolism of the dolls' appearance. She explores the link between doll making and other traditional Russian art forms. There will be a quick stop at the 1900 World's Fair in Paris that made Russian nested dolls and Fabergé eggs famous, followed by an illustrated tour of a working doll-making factory in rural Russia. SATURDAY, AUGUST 15TH, HANDS ON NESTED DOLL MAKING FROM 10-12PM. PLEASE RSVP - LIMITED ENROLLMENT.
    Location: Weeks Memorial Library, 128 Main St., Lancaster
Saturday August 15, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 11:00 AM Harnessing History: On the Trail of New Hampshire's State Dog, the Chinook Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Karen Holland   654-2480   
    This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. Inquire whether the speaker's dog will accompany him.THIS EVENT IS PART OF THE LYNDEBOROUGH COMMUNITY DAY.
    Location: Lyndeborough Old Town Hall, 1131 Center Rd., Lyndeborough
 
misc_none 1:00 PM Teddy Roosevelt's Nobel Prize: New Hampshire and the Portsmouth Peace Treaty Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Claire James   938-2041   
    Teddy Roosevelt chose Portsmouth to be the site of the 1905 peace treaty negotiations between Russian and Japanese delegations to end the Russo-Japanese war. Charles Doleac's program first focuses on Roosevelt's multi-track diplomacy that included other world powers, the Russian and Japanese delegations, the US Navy, and New Hampshire hosts in 30 days of negotiations that resulted in the Portsmouth Peace Treaty and earned Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize. The program then focuses on how ordinary people from throughout New Hampshire positively affected the Portsmouth negotiations. The program customizes each presentation to the program site's local history at the time of the treaty to encourage audiences to join the annual statewide commemoration of "Portsmouth Peace Treaty Day" on September 5.
    Location: The Tin Shop, 160 East Main St., Bradford
Sunday August 16, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 11:30 AM A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Don Johnson   529-7764   
    Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape. Such a project can help landowners know what to do if they have archaeological sites on their land and help stimulate interest in a town's future through its past.
    Location: Deering Community Church, 763 Deering Ctr. Rd., Deering
 
misc_none 2:00 PM Liberty Is Our Motto!: Songs and Stories of the Hutchinson Family Singers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Nola Aldrich   526-2942   
    The year is 1876, and New Hampshire's own John Hutchinson sings and tells about his famous musical family "straight from the horse's mouth." Originally from Milford, NH, the Hutchinson Family Singers were among America's most notable musical entertainers for much of the mid-19th century. They achieved international recognition with songs advancing social reform and political causes such as abolition, temperance, women's suffrage, and the Lincoln presidential campaign of 1860. In this living history program, Steve Blunt portrays John Hutchinson. He tells the Hutchinsons' story and shares their music with lyrics provided. Audience members are invited to sing along on "The Old Granite State," "Get Off the Track," "Tenting on the Old Campground," and more.
    Location: Wilmot Town Hall, 11 N. Wilmot Rd., Wilmot
Tuesday August 18, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Movie Mavericks: Filmmakers who Challenge the Hollywood System Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jessica Sheehan   497-2102   
    Patrick Anderson focuses on contemporary film directors and screenwriters in the United States whose originality, independence and unconventional approaches to the medium have contributed to the evolution of the industry. The program provides a greater understanding of and appreciation for both the content and form of movies made outside the mainstream Hollywood system, and to consider some of the key differences in theme, style and narrative format between these works and the more conventional fare of so-called "classic cinema." Among the filmmakers to be examined are Steven Soderbergh, David Lynch, John Sayles, Spike Lee, Quentin Tarantino, the Coen brothers, Wes Anderson, Sofia Coppola, P.T. Anderson, Jim Jarmusch and Charlie Kaufman. Patrick Anderson urges participants to view and analyze a variety of film clips carefully so that, by the end of the session, they will be more visually articulate and critically aware of how one "reads" a film.
    Location: Goffstown Public Library, 2 High St., Goffstown
 
misc_none 7:00 PM A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Andrea Douglas   774-3546   
    Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape. Such a project can help landowners know what to do if they have archaeological sites on their land and help stimulate interest in a town's future through its past.
    Location: Dunbarton Public Library, 1004 School St., Dunbarton
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sandra Hammond   569-3745   
    Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.
    Location: East Alton Meeting House, 347 Drew Hill Road, Alton
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Wednesday August 19, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Pleasures of the Parlor: Middle-class Domestic Music-making in 19th-century New England Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Denise Vallee   466-3322   
    In 1904, 150 delegates to the National Piano Dealers' convention waved lights and danced around a bonfire made of hundreds of square pianos. Why? What's a square piano? How had middle-class Americans, their instruments and their songs changed over the preceding decades? Marya Danihel discusses music made at home in pre-Victorian and Victorian New England, illustrating her social and music history with live performances of songs from 19th-century collections, contemporary paintings and illustrations, and excerpts from etiquette books and memoirs like those of Portsmouth's Sarah Parker Rice Goodwin, wife of New Hampshire's Civil War governor.
    Location: Medallion Opera House, 20 Park St., Gorham
Thursday August 20, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Lizzie Borden Took an Axe, Or Did She? Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Tracy Quigley   938-2078   
    In 1892 Lizzie Borden, a 32-year-old single woman, was officially charged with the murder of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. The events that followed the murder would stir the curiosity of people across the nation. After four official criminal proceedings, Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the murder but the case was not officially reinvestigated by the authorities. To this day the case of Lizzie Borden is a mystery that has inspired television movies, documentaries, cinematic offerings, plays, musicals, poems, websites, blogs, a scholarly journal, college courses, and law school case studies. Annette Holba reviews the facts of the case and explores the evidence that some experts suggest points to Lizzie's guilt and others believe points to Lizzie's innocence. Lizzie's connections to New Hampshire are also discussed.
    Location: Brown Memorial Library, 78 W. Main St., Bradford
Friday August 21, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM Teddy Roosevelt's Nobel Prize: New Hampshire and the Portsmouth Peace Treaty Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Dublin Historical Society   563-8545   
    Teddy Roosevelt chose Portsmouth to be the site of the 1905 peace treaty negotiations between Russian and Japanese delegations to end the Russo-Japanese war. Charles Doleac's program first focuses on Roosevelt's multi-track diplomacy that included other world powers, the Russian and Japanese delegations, the US Navy, and New Hampshire hosts in 30 days of negotiations that resulted in the Portsmouth Peace Treaty and earned Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize. The program then focuses on how ordinary people from throughout New Hampshire positively affected the Portsmouth negotiations. The program customizes each presentation to the program site's local history at the time of the treaty to encourage audiences to join the annual statewide commemoration of "Portsmouth Peace Treaty Day" on September 5.
    Location: Dublin Community Church, 1125 Main St., Dublin
Sunday August 23, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 2:00 PM Wit and Wisdom: Humor in 19th Century New England Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Veronica Mueller   764-9072   
    Whatever did New Englanders do on long winter evenings before cable, satellite and the internet? In the decades before and after the Civil War, our rural ancestors used to create neighborhood events to improve their minds. Community members male and female would compose and read aloud homegrown, handwritten literary "newspapers" full of keen verbal wit. Sometimes serious, sometimes sentimental but mostly very funny, these "newspapers" were common in villages across Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont and revealed the hopes, fears, humor and surprisingly daring behavior of our forebears. Jo Radner shares excerpts from her forthcoming book about hundreds of these "newspapers" and provides examples from villages in your region.
    Location: Joseph Patch Library, 320 NH Rte 25, Warren
Monday August 24, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Mapping the Merrimack: A Frontier Adventure into Uncharted Territory 1630-1725 Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Charles Brault   878-1105   
    David Stewart-Smith recounts the expeditions of 1638 and 1652 up the Merrimack to establish the northern boundary of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. There is just one problem: New Hampshire proprietors already held claim to all the land east of the river. In fact, maps of the time did not reflect the true course of the river. Stewart-Smith examines the maps of the 17th century along with the plan from the 1638 survey to show that the Merrimack River was not accurately represented in maps of the region until the end of that century. The boundary for Massachusetts became an embarrassment -- so much so that they had to revise their state line survey. The program describes some of the early survey techniques and cartography and is illustrated with the maps of the period.
    Location: Chamberlin Free Public Library, 46 Main St., Greenville
Tuesday August 25, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 10:30 AM That Reminds Me of a Story Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Kim Tilton   659-4469   
    Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity. Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place. She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own.
    Location: Sunrise Sunset Activity Ctr., 2 Terrace Dr., Newmarket
 
misc_none 6:30 PM Darby Field and the First Ascent of Mount Washington Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sandy Allgood   744-3352   
    For more than 200 years historians believed that Darby Field made the first climb up Mount Washington in 1642. However, in the last several decades, questions have emerged about his use of Native American guides, about the likelihood of prior ascents by Native Americans, about the route Field may have followed on the mountain, and about whether Field actually made the ascent as claimed. Allen Koop examines how historians reconstruct the "truth" when given scant, vague, and even contradictory evidence.
    Location: Minot-Sleeper Library, 35 Pleasant St., Bristol
Wednesday August 26, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Susan Tracy   363-8860   
    Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape. Such a project can help landowners know what to do if they have archaeological sites on their land and help stimulate interest in a town's future through its past.
    Location: Chesterfield Town Hall, Rte. 63, Chesterfield
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Harnessing History: On the Trail of New Hampshire's State Dog, the Chinook Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Lisa Doner   536-3358   
    This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. Inquire whether the speaker's dog will accompany him.
    Location: Quincy Bog Natural Area (Nature Ctr.), 131 Quincy Bog Rd., Rumney
Tuesday September 1, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM The Old Man of the Mountain: Substance and Symbol Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Judy Smith   539-3223 x 226   
    The story of the Old Man of the Mountain in Franconia Notch is a story of New Hampshire itself, reflecting history, the arts, literature, geography, philosophy and public policy. Maggie Stier's illustrated talk reveals the ways that this iconic place has sparked observers' imaginations, attracted intense personal commitment, and symbolized changing public sentiment. Stier details the threats to the Old Man and Franconia Notch that led to protection as a State Park and, later, to the construction of the Franconia Notch Parkway. She concludes with an analysis of what caused the fall of the Old Man in 2003, a summary of private efforts to create a memorial, and a discussion of how this unique natural phenomenon may be remembered by future generations. The audience is invited to bring souvenirs, memorabilia or other artifacts of the Old Man of the Mountain for a shared display before and after the program, and to share their own experiences and memories on this topic.
    Location: Camp Calumet Conference Ctr. Dining room,1090 Ossipee Lake Rd., Freedom
Thursday September 3, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Witches, Pop Culture, and the Past Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Mary Jo Marvin   784-5480   
    "Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.
    Location: Jaffrey Public Library, 38 Main St., Jaffrey
 
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Leigh Webb   934-8222   
    Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.
    Location: Franklin Public Library, 310 Central St. (upstairs), Franklin
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Wednesday September 9, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 12:30 PM Revolutionary New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Alison Vallieres   774-3681   
    In 1760, New Hampshire had a stable government. That government collapsed by 1776 and it took until the early 1790s to restore the stability of the pre-Revolutionary era. Jere Daniell shares a history of these changes that is both fascinating and complex. Choose from three topics: "The Coming of Revolution," "The New Hampshire Town That Joined Vermont," or "The Origins of the New Hampshire State Constitution."
    Location: First Congregational Church Parish Hall, 1548 Hopkinton Rd., Hopkinton
 
misc_none 6:00 PM Native American History of New Hampshire: Beyond Boundaries, circa 1700-1850 Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Meagan Carr   342-3086   
    The northern frontier of New England was a risky place during the Colonial Period. Maine was nearly lost due to a series of Indian wars. New Hampshire only succeeded in settling the coast and as the frontier moved inland, both settlers and Indians found that their cultures had changed. Another set of wars to wrest Canada away from the French gave rise to several attempts by the Indians to assert their autonomy and stewardship over the land. By the time of Ethan Allen Crawford, the New Hampshire frontier had become a place for reflection on a new relationship with the environment, and tourism into the mountains was born. David Stewart-Smith muses that as the "last" Indians died off in the 1830s, perhaps a legacy was born that would insure a place for the landscape and the spirit of the Indians in New Hampshire's future.
    Location: White Mountains Community College Fortier Library, 2020 Riverside Dr., Berlin
 
misc_none 7:00 PM African American Soldiers and Sailors of New Hampshire During the American Revolution Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Abby Pietrantonio   772-2622   
    One of the most interesting aspects of the American Revolution is the role played by African Americans in the fight for independence. Both free Blacks and those that were enslaved were key elements in manning state militias and Continental Army units, as well as serving on the high seas in the Navy and on privately armed ships. Indeed, their service to New Hampshire, as well as the other New England colonies, was crucial in a conflict that lasted nearly seven years. Prohibited by existing laws from serving in military units and largely considered "undesirable elements" by southern patriots and even many in New England, how is it that these Black soldiers came to fight for the cause of liberty, even when their own personal liberty was not guaranteed? Glenn Knoblock examines the history of Black soldiers' service during the war, including how and why they enlisted, their interaction with white soldiers, service on the battlefields, how they were perceived by the enemy and the officers under whom they served, and their treatment after the war.
    Location: Folsom Tavern, 164 Water St., Exeter
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Angling in the Smile of the Great Spirit Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Patricia Barry   838-2451   
    Anyone who ever posted a Gone Fishin' sign on the door during business hours will appreciate this native fisherman's glimpse in to the habits, rituals, and lore of some of the more colorful members of the not-so-exclusive "Liars' Club." Hal Lyon shares tales, secrets, folklore, and history of fishing in New Hampshire's big lakes -- especially Lake Winnipesaukee which translates into "Smile of the Great Spirit."
    Location: Lyman Town Hall, 65 Parker Hill Rd., Lyman
Thursday September 10, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 1:00 PM Banjos, Bones, and Ballads Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Brenda Saunders   542-5335   
    Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.
    Location: St. Joseph Church, 58 Elm St., Claremont
 
misc_none 1:00 PM That Reminds Me of a Story Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Parish Helpers, Inc   522-3189   
    Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity. Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place. She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own.
    Location: First Congregational Church, UCC, 2718 Wakefield Rd., Wakefield
 
misc_none 6:30 PM On This Spot Once Stood... Remembering the Architectural Heritage of New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Hooksett Library   485-6092   
    New Hampshire has lost many of its important historic buildings to fire, neglect, intentional demolition and re-development. In some cases, a plaque or marker provides a physical reminder of what was, but in other examples, no tangible evidence remains. Maggie Stier showcases some of the celebrated buildings that New Hampshire has lost, and explores how and why we remember and commemorate those losses. Her program will draw from historical and contemporary photographs, maps, and other historical records to explore the significance of these structures, explain their eventual fate, and analyze popular responses to the loss. Particular attention will be devoted to places where a building was memorialized in some way. Examples in this illustrated talk will include the simple wooden signs where the hotels in Bethlehem once stood, a large-scale installation of architectural fragments in Concord, and the birthplaces of several notable citizens. Audiences will be challenged to think about other examples, and consider the ways in which we remember what isn't there any longer.
    Location: Hooksett Library, 31 Mount Saint Mary's Way, Hooksett
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Comics in World History and Cultures Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Rosanna Dude   526-6804   
    Marek Bennett presents a whirlwind survey of comics from around the world and throughout history, with special attention to what these vibrant narratives tell (and show) us about the people and periods that created them. Bennett engages and involves the audience in an interactive discussion of several sample comics representing cultures such as Ancient Rome, Medieval Europe, the Ancient Maya, Feudal and modern Japan, the United States in the early 20th century, and Nazi Germany during World War II. The program explores the various ways of creating and reading comics from around the world, and what these techniques tell us about the cultures in which they occur.
    Location: Wilmot Public Library, 11 N. Wilmot Rd., Wilmot
Friday September 11, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Traditional Matryoshka Nested Doll Making: from Russia to New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Elizabeth Thompson   466-2525   
    Marina Forbes shares many examples of Matroyshka nested dolls, including examples of her own work and from her extensive collection, as she examines the rich folk tradition and symbolism of the dolls' appearance. She explores the link between doll making and other traditional Russian art forms. There will be a quick stop at the 1900 World's Fair in Paris that made Russian nested dolls and Fabergé eggs famous, followed by an illustrated tour of a working doll-making factory in rural Russia.
    Location: Gorham Public Library, 35 Railroad St., Gorham
 
misc_none 8:00 PM The Music History of French-Canadians, Franco-Americans, Acadians and Cajuns Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: The Margret & H.A. Rey Center   236-3308   
    Lucie Therrien follows the migration of French-Canadians and the evolution of their traditional music: its arrival in North America from France; the music's crossing with Indian culture during the evangelization of Acadia and Quebec; its growth alongside English culture after British colonization; and its expansion from Quebec to New England, as well as from Acadia to Louisiana.
    Location: Town Square Resort - The Rey Ctr. (Bldg. C), 35 Village Rd., Waterville Valley
Saturday September 12, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 2:00 PM Cows and Communities: How the Lowly Bovine Has Nurtured New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Hampton Falls Historical Society   778-4775   
    Cattle were essential to the survival of the earliest New Hampshire settlements, and their contributions have been central to the life and culture of the state ever since. From providing human dietary sustenance to basic motive power for agriculture, forestry and transport, bovines have had a deep and enduring bond with their keepers, one that lingers today and is a vital part of the iconography of rural New Hampshire, even as dairy farming becomes ever more reliant on intensive modern science and technology. Where are New Hampshire's cows today and what are are they doing? Steve Taylor provides answers -- some will prove surprising. THERE WILL BE AN ICE CREAM SOCIAL FOLLOWING THE PRESENTATION.
    Location: Hampton Falls Historical Society, 1 Drinkwater Rd., Hampton Falls
Sunday September 13, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 2:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Malcolm Cameron   463-7076   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Deerfield Town Hall, 10 Church St., Deerfield
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misc_none 2:00 PM The Shaker Legacy Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Cheryl McGinnis   863-5023   
    In their more than two and a half centuries of existence, members of the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, commonly known as Shakers, made ingenious contributions to diverse fields: agriculture, industry, medicine, music, furniture design, women's rights, racial equality, craftsmanship, social and religious thought, and mechanical invention and improvement. Darryl Thompson explores some of these contributions in his lecture and shares some of his personal memories of the Canterbury Shakers.
    Location: Lempster History Hall, 4 2nd NH Tpk., Lempster
Monday September 14, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jane Butler   588-2637   
    Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape. Such a project can help landowners know what to do if they have archaeological sites on their land and help stimulate interest in a town's future through its past.
    Location: Franklin Pierce Homestead, 301 2nd NH Turnpike, Hillsboro
 
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire’s Long Love-Hate Relationship with Its Agricultural Fairs Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Stuart Hodgeman   477-2844   
    The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam and other "scandalous dimensions" that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint. Steve Taylor will discuss the ups and downs of the fairs down through years and how public affection for rural traditions helps them survive in contemporary times.
    Location: Cornish Town Office Bldg., 488 Town House Rd., Cornish
Tuesday September 15, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Christine Fogg   524-8268   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Corner Meeting House, Intersection of Fuller & Sargent St., Belmont
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Popular Music During World War II: Using Propaganda to Boost Morale Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Donna Hamill   569-1212   
    World War II brought about a government-sponsored drive to unify the country and increase morale both at home and abroad in the military. Over 2,000 songs relating to the war and home front efforts were written with those goals in mind. Focusing on these songs, Knickerbocker uses thirty-five recording excerpts, some well-known and others obscure, to explore the historical era and the changes this music wrought in the culture. Presented by Calvin Knickerbocker.
    Location: Wright Museum, 77 Center St., Wolfeboro
Wednesday September 16, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Benedict Arnold: Patriot and Traitor? Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Eric Stern   679-8484   
    We all think we know the story of Benedict Arnold, the American Revolutionary War general who fought for the Continental Army but then defected to the British. Recalled mainly as a traitor for his 1780 defection, Arnold had risked his life and fortune for American freedom in courageous exploits between 1775 and 1778, when the dream of independence was at its most fragile. As an officer in the Continental Army, Arnold ably led American forces in desperate circumstances - against impossible odds, in a blinding snowstorm, through a howling wilderness, and against the extraordinary might of the Royal Navy. George Morrison will take you on a journey through New England, Canada and New York tracing the complex story of this infamous American icon.
    Location: Blaisdell Memorial Library, 129 Stage Rd., Nottingham
 
misc_none 6:30 PM Witches, Pop Culture, and the Past Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Shirley Young   447-5552   
    "Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.
    Location: Conway Public Library, 15 Main St., Conway
 
misc_none 7:00 PM A Tribute to Sarah Josepha Hale Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Polly Cote   673-1946   
    A native of Newport, New Hampshire, America's first female editor, Sarah Josepha Hale, made Godey's Lady's Book the most influential women's magazine of its time. She is also known as the author of the poem "Mary's Lamb" and for her efforts over three decades to have Thanksgiving decreed a national holiday. In this living history set in 1866, Sharon Wood portrays Ann Wyman Blake, a resident of West Cambridge, Massachusetts, speaking of her admiration for Hale. As Blake, Wood shares stories of Hale's many accomplishments while living in Boston, including an editorial career that spanned five decades.
    Location: Milford Town Hall Bnqt Rm. (Side Ent. on Middle St., Take Elevator to 3rd Fl.), 1 Union Sq., Milford
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Harnessing History: On the Trail of New Hampshire's State Dog, the Chinook Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carol Brock   547-2730   
    This program looks at how dog sledding developed in New Hampshire and how the Chinook played a major role in this story. Explaining how man and his relationship with dogs won out over machines on several famous polar expeditions, Bob Cottrell covers the history of Arthur Walden and his Chinooks, the State Dog of New Hampshire. Inquire whether the speaker's dog will accompany him.
    Location: Francestown Town Offices (In Back), 27 Main St., Francestown
 
misc_none 7:00 PM The Founding Fathers: What Were They Thinking? Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: John Shipman   539-5799   
    In 1787 delegates gathered in Philadelphia to address a wide variety of crises facing the young United States of America and produced a charter for a new government. In modern times, competing political and legal claims are frequently based on what those delegates intended. Mythology about the founders and their work at the 1787 Convention has obscured both fact and legitimate analysis of the events leading to the agreement called the Constitution. Richard Hesse explores the cast of characters called "founders," the problems they faced, and the solutions they fashioned.
    Location: Freedom Town Hall, 12 Elm St., Freedom
 
misc_none 7:30 PM Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Holderness Library   968-7066   
    Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.
    Location: Holderness Historical Society, Rte 3 (Curry Place behind Post Office), Holderness
Thursday September 17, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Gandhi: The Man and his Teaching Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Conway Public Library   447-5552   
    Mohandas Gandhi, one of the most influential and unusual world leaders of the 20th century, argued that there was no difference between personal and political morality. His method of non-violent resistance attracted millions of followers in India and around the world. Through fasting, organizing marches, and disobeying British laws he thought were unjust, he led India to freedom from colonial rule and inspired other leaders such as Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King. Donald Johnson examines the life and ideas of the man who believed that we cannot destroy ideas by killing the people who hold them.
    Location: Conway Public Library, 15 Main St., Conway
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misc_none 7:00 PM John Winant: New Hampshire Man of The World Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Allison Galliher   436-8433   
    John G. Winant, three-time governor of New Hampshire went on to serve the nation in several capacities on the national and international scene. In the process he became a hero to the British in World War Two and to the common man throughout the developed world. His life, marked by highs and lows, ended tragically in his mansion in Concord. The program examines his life and measures his impact at home and abroad.
    Location: Discover Portsmouth, 10 Middle St., Portsmouth
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Ratification of the Constitution in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sally Bashalany   578-6876   
    The Granite State came very close to voting against ratification of the proposed Federal Constitution. Had it done so, the nation we know today might not exist. What tactics did supporters of ratification use to snatch victory from defeat? Your town may have played a definitive role and Jere Daniell knows all about it. THIS EVENT WILL BE IN CONJUNCTION WITH CONSTITUTION DAY.
    Location: Nashua Community College Gregg Hall Auditorium, 505 Amherst St., Nashua
 
misc_none 7:00 PM The Guitar in Latin America: Continuities, Changes and Bicultural Strumming Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: North Hampton Public Library   964-6326   
    Jose Lezcano presents a multi-media musical program that showcases the guitar in Latin America as an instrument that speaks many languages. Lezcano presents a variety of musical styles: indigenous strummers in ritual festivals from Ecuador, Gaucho music from Argentina, European parlor waltzes from Venezuela, and Afro-Brazilian samba-pagode. He also plays pieces by Villa-Lobos, Brouwer, Lauro, Barrios, Pereira, and examples from his Fulbright-funded research in Ecuador.
    Location: North Hampton Public Library, 237A Atlantic Ave., North Hampton
Friday September 18, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 10:00 AM Russian Iconography: 1,000 Years of Tradition Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church   752-2254   
    Traditional Russian icon painting has been a living and evolving art form for more than 1,000 years. This illustrated presentation by Marina Forbes deals with the spiritual and secular significance of Russian religious art from the 10th century to the present day. Icon-making involves the painting of stylized religious images on wood using traditional natural materials and techniques which are determined by longstanding conventions. Using a slide show and numerous exhibits, including examples of her own work, Forbes examines the history of icon painting in Russia and the unique nature of the icon as a sacred object and a product of an artistic tradition. Participants may bring personal icons for examination and comments. THIS EVENT IS PART OF BERLIN'S 100 ANNIVERSARY.
    Location: Holy Resurrection Orthodox Church, 20 Petrograd St., Berlin
 
misc_none 7:00 PM (Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Mary Girard   487-3391   
    The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan's presentation explores the origins of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.
    Location: Whipple Free Library, 67 Mont Vernon Rd., New Boston
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Mary Todd Lincoln: Wife and Widow Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Don Brown   887-3842   
    Living historian Sally Mummey portrays Mary Todd Lincoln as she muses on her life from her dreams as a girl to her years as First Lady during the Civil War. Mrs. Lincoln shares stories of her life with President Lincoln and the events of that evening in Ford's Theatre when the assassin's bullet not only changed the course of the nation but destroyed her life as well. From the opulence of the White House to the dregs of obscurity, Mrs. Lincoln lived out her life struggling with affliction and tragedy. With wit and heartbreak, seasoned with abiding love for her husband and her children, Mrs. Lincoln reveals the passionate humanity of a misunderstood woman.
    Location: Stevens Hall, 1 Chester St., Chester
 
misc_none 7:00 PM On This Spot Once Stood... Remembering the Architectural Heritage of New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sheila Jones   539-4071   
    New Hampshire has lost many of its important historic buildings to fire, neglect, intentional demolition and re-development. In some cases, a plaque or marker provides a physical reminder of what was, but in other examples, no tangible evidence remains. Maggie Stier showcases some of the celebrated buildings that New Hampshire has lost, and explores how and why we remember and commemorate those losses. Her program will draw from historical and contemporary photographs, maps, and other historical records to explore the significance of these structures, explain their eventual fate, and analyze popular responses to the loss. Particular attention will be devoted to places where a building was memorialized in some way. Examples in this illustrated talk will include the simple wooden signs where the hotels in Bethlehem once stood, a large-scale installation of architectural fragments in Concord, and the birthplaces of several notable citizens. Audiences will be challenged to think about other examples, and consider the ways in which we remember what isn't there any longer.
    Location: Effingham Historical Society Bldg., 1014 Province Lake Rd., Effingham
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Treasure from the Isles of Shoals: How New Archaeology is Changing Old History Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: East Kingston Public Library   642-8333   
    There is treasure here but not the pirate kind. Scientific "digs" on Smuttynose Island are changing New England history. Archaeologist Nathan Hamilton has unearthed 300,000 artifacts to date on this largely uninhabited rock at the Isles of Shoals. Evidence proves prehistoric Native Americans hunted New Hampshire's only offshore islands 6,000 years ago. Hundreds of European fishermen split, salted, and dried valuable Atlantic cod here from the 1620s. "King Haley" ruled a survivalist kingdom here before Thomas Laighton struck tourist gold when his family took over the region's first hotel on Smuttynose. Laighton's daughter Celia Thaxter spun poetic tales of ghosts and pirates. J. Dennis Robinson, a longtime Smuttynose steward, explores the truth behind the romantic legends of Gosport Harbor in this colorful show-and-tell presentation.
    Location: East Kingston Public Library, 47 Maplevale Rd., East Kingston
Saturday September 19, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 2:00 PM Songs of Old New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Amy Friedman   886-6030   
    Drawing heavily on the repertoire of traditional singer Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) of Jaffrey and Temple, New Hampshire, Jeff Warner offers the songs and stories that, in the words of Carl Sandburg, tell us "where we came from and what brought us along." These ballads, love songs and comic pieces, reveal the experiences and emotions of daily life in the days before movies, sound recordings and, for some, books. Songs from the lumber camps, the decks of sailing ships, the textile mills and the war between the sexes offer views of pre-industrial New England and a chance to hear living artifacts from the 18th and 19th centuries.
    Location: Rodgers Memorial Library, 194 Derry Rd., Hudson
Sunday September 20, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 11:30 AM The Middle East Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Don Johnson   529-7764   
    The term "Middle East" is a changing geopolitical concept. Throughout recent history, this term referred to a political, a cultural, and a geographical region with no clear boundaries. Moreover, this concept serves to generate stereotypes and misunderstanding. This multimedia presentation by Mohamed Defaa provides an analytical framework to understand the histories, social identities, and cultures behind this complex concept of "Middle East."
    Location: Deering Community Church, 763 Deering Ctr. Rd., Deering
Monday September 21, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Lois Caveney   286-4795   
    Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.
    Location: Northfield Town Hall, 21 Summer St., Northfield
Tuesday September 22, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Traditional Matryoshka Nested Doll Making: from Russia to New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Ingalls Memorial Library   899-3303   
    Marina Forbes shares many examples of Matroyshka nested dolls, including examples of her own work and from her extensive collection, as she examines the rich folk tradition and symbolism of the dolls' appearance. She explores the link between doll making and other traditional Russian art forms. There will be a quick stop at the 1900 World's Fair in Paris that made Russian nested dolls and Fabergé eggs famous, followed by an illustrated tour of a working doll-making factory in rural Russia.
    Location: Ingalls Memorial Library, 203 Main St., Rindge
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misc_none 7:00 PM Contra Dancing In New Hampshire: Then and Now Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Northwood Historical Society   834-4098   
    Since the late 1600s, the lively tradition of contra dancing has kept people of all ages swinging and sashaying in barns, town halls and schools around the state. Contra dancing came to New Hampshire by way of the English colonists and remains popular in many communities, particularly in the Monadnock Region. Presenter Dudley Laufman brings this tradition to life with stories, poems and recordings of callers, musicians, and dancers, past and present. Live music, always integral to this dance form, will be played on the fiddle and melodeon. Willing audience members may be invited to dance the Virginia Reel!
    Location: Northwood Community Hall, 135 Main St., Northwood
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Gary Attalla   774-0069   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: St. John's Episcopal Church, 270 Stark Hwy. N., Dunbarton
 
misc_none 7:30 PM Exemplary Country Estates of New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: John Dickey   267-6098   
    In the early 20th Century, the New Hampshire Board of Agriculture launched a program to boost the rural economy and promote tourism through the sale of abandoned farms to summer residents. After introducing the country house movement, Cristina Ashjian focuses attention on some of the great country estates featured in the NH program between 1902 and 1913. Which private estates were recognized as exemplary, and who were their owners? Using historic images and texts, Ashjian discusses well-known estates now open to the public such as The Fells on Lake Sunapee, The Rocks in Bethlehem, and Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish.
    Location: Gilmanton Old Town Hall, 1800 NH Rte 140, Gilmanton Iron Works
Wednesday September 23, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM Digging Into Native History in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Denise Jensen   752-5210   
    Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth's surface.
    Location: White Mountains Community College Fortier Library, 2020 Riverside Dr., Berlin
 
misc_none 6:30 PM (Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Silsby Free Public Library   826-7793   
    The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan's presentation explores the origins of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.
    Location: Silsby Free Public Library, 226 Main St., Charlestown
 
misc_none 6:30 PM The Arab Springs: Diverse Societies in Revolt Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Denise Grimse   436-8548   
    The Arab Spring has been widely hailed as a broad democratic movement rebelling against long-standing authoritarian regimes. It is not a single movement, however, but a diverse collection of important political and social protests and revolts with significant impacts on American interests. Mark Willis inspects the movement against the political and social backgrounds of the different countries involved, revealing a kaleidoscope of motivations, results and challenges.
    Location: Weeks Public Library, 36 Post Rd., Greenland
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Rally Round the Flag: The American Civil War Through Folksong Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sally Woodman   382-7574   
    Woody Pringle and Marek Bennett present an overview of the American Civil War through the lens of period music. Audience members participate and sing along as the presenters explore lyrics, documents, and visual images from sources such as the Library of Congress. Through camp songs, parlor music, hymns, battlefield rallying cries, and fiddle tunes, Pringle and Bennett examine the folksong as a means to enact living history, share perspectives, influence public perceptions of events, and simultaneously fuse and conserve cultures in times of change. Showcasing numerous instruments, the presenters challenge participants to find new connections between song, art, and politics in American history. (Note: Please contact Woody Pringle to book this program.)
    Location: Newton Town Hall, 2 Town Hall Rd., Newton
Thursday September 24, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:45 PM The Finest Hours :The True Story Behind the U.S. Coast Guard's Most Daring Sea Rescue Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Hooksett Library   485-6092   
    On February 18, 1952, an astonishing maritime event began when a ferocious nor'easter split in half a 500-foot long oil tanker, the Pendleton, approximately one mile off the coast of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Incredibly, just twenty miles away, a second oil tanker, the Fort Mercer, also split in half. On both tankers men were trapped on the severed bows and sterns, and all four sections were sinking in 60-foot seas. Thus began a life and death drama of survival, heroism, and a series of tragic mistakes. Of the 84 seamen aboard the tankers, 70 would be rescued and 14 would lose their lives. Michael Tougias, co-author of the book and soon-to-be Disney movie The Finest Hours, uses slides to illustrate the harrowing tale of the rescue efforts amidst towering waves and blinding snow in one of the most dangerous shoals in the world. THERE WILL BE A HOOKSETT HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING PRIOR TO THE PRESENTATION THAT IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.
    Location: Hooksett Library, 31 Mount Saint Mary's Way, Hooksett
 
misc_none 7:00 PM A Visit with Abraham Lincoln Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Julie Steenson   547-2790   
    Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address." Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.
    Location: Greenfield Town Meetinghouse, Forest Rd., Greenfield
 
misc_none 7:00 PM African American Submariners of World War II and Beyond Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Portsmouth Athenaeum   431-2538   
    African American soldiers and sailors saw extensive action during World War II in nearly every theatre of operations. Though few in number, Black submariners played an important role in manning the navy submarines, many built at Portsmouth, which wrought havoc against Japanese naval and merchant vessels. Limited by the U.S. Navy's segregation policies to service as officers' stewards, many Black sailors in fact performed combat duty with great bravery and distinction, including such men as Walter Wilson, the battle-station helmsman aboard the legendary submarine Trigger; Bronze Star medalist George Lytle aboard Drum; and Arthur Brown, who participated in the rescue and care of many refugees liberated from Japanese-held islands while serving aboard Narwhal. Glenn Knoblock's talk, based on hundreds of interviews with World War II veterans and years of research, leaves the audience with a better understanding of the Submarine Force during World War II and appreciation for America's undersea warriors. THIS EVENT IS PART OF THE PORTSMOUTH MARITIME FOLK FESTIVAL.
    Location: Portsmouth Athenaeum, 6 Market Square, Portsmouth
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jan Eskedel   367-8758   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: Madison Library Chick Room, 1895 Village Rd., Madison
Friday September 25, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM The Creep of Surveillance: From Big Brother to Mom and Dad Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Laura French   456-2234   
    Technology has been used to monitor offenders, consumers, workers, students, and even children. Technology has enabled law enforcement and other agents of social control to uncover a range of information and behavior that previously went undetected. This presentation explores the expanded use of technology for monitoring people's compliance, performance, and even personal legitimacy. David Mackey discusses the devious devices and some of the legal, social, and ethical implications of their use.
    Location: New Hampshire Telephone Museum, 1 Depot St., Warner
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Saturday September 26, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM Family, Memory, Place: Writing Family Stories Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Cynthia Phillips   863-6921   
    What family stories do you carry with you? What story do you tell over and over? What landscape do you cherish the most? One of the deepest human instincts is to tell our life stories, to figure out who we are and what it means to be human. This interactive workshop led by Martha Andrews Donovan and Maura MacNeil explores how the landscapes of our lives shape the stories that we tell. Participants explore the themes of family, memory, and place through sample narratives and a series of short writing exercises, gaining a deeper awareness of how their stories can preserve personal, generational, and communal history.
    Location: Olive G. Pettis Library, 36 Mill Village Rd. (Rte 10 North), Goshen
 
misc_none 7:00 PM The Connecticut: New England's Great River Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Bath Public Library   747-3372   
    The largest river in New England rises in a small beaver pond near the Canadian border and flows over 400 miles through four states, falling 2,670 feet to the sea through America's only watershed-based national fish and wildlife refuge. Adair Mulligan leads an armchair tour of this great river in New Hampshire and Vermont, exploring its history and natural beauty through the seasons and among the communities that have sprung up along its banks. Next, the discussion will shift to how the river has influenced the lives of those who live there, and how they, in turn, have affected the river. Much more than a travelogue, this presentation explores the many issues involved in managing the health of this major river, and how citizens from all walks of life have created a vision for its future.
    Location: Bath Village School, 61 Lisbon Rd., Bath
Monday September 28, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM A Visit With Queen Victoria Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jennifer Carroll   352-1895   
    In 1837, teenaged Victoria ascended to the British throne, untrained and innocent. Those who would try to usurp her power underestimated this self-willed intelligent young woman whose mettle sustained her through her 63-year reign. Using Queen Victoria's diary and letters, this program reveals the personal details of a powerful yet humane woman, who took seriously her role as monarch in a time of great expansion. She and her husband, Albert, set an example of high moral character and dedication, a novelty in the royal house after generations of scandal. Through her children she left a royal legacy; an era bears her name. Sally Mummey performs this living history in proper 19th Century clothing resplendent with Royal Orders.
    Location: Historical Society of Cheshire County, 246 Main St., Keene
 
misc_none 7:00 PM George Washington Spied Here: Spies and Spying in the American Revolutionary War (1775 - 1783) Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Ricky Sirois   483-5374   
    Based on recently discovered historical materials and recent books, this program by Douglas Wheeler is an inquiry into the life and death of America's first spy, the patriot-martyr, Nathan Hale, of Coventry, Connecticut. Wheeler takes audiences on a journey through the spy world of the Culper Spy Ring of New York, Long Island and Connecticut, the most secret of the American spy rings and the most successful in getting useful intelligence to General George Washington beginning in 1778, two years after Hale's tragic execution by the British. The Father of our country was also our first Intelligence Chief. The program is illustrated with images of the main places and dramatis personae of this unusual network of patriot secret agents and couriers.
    Location: Griffin Free Public Library, 22 Hooksett Rd., Auburn
Tuesday September 29, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 5:30 PM (Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Effingham Public Library   539-1537   
    The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan's presentation explores the origins of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.
    Location: Effingham Public Library, 30 Town House Rd., Effingham
Wednesday September 30, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM A Walk Back in Time: The Secrets of Cellar Holes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sandra Cleary   588-2343   
    Northern New England is full of reminders of past lives: stone walls, old foundations, a century-old lilac struggling to survive as the forest reclaims a once-sunny dooryard. What forces shaped settlement, and later abandonment, of these places? Adair Mulligan explores the rich story to be discovered in what remains behind. See how one town has set out to create an inventory of its cellar holes, piecing together the clues in the landscape. Such a project can help landowners know what to do if they have archaeological sites on their land and help stimulate interest in a town's future through its past.
    Location: Bennington Historical Society, 38 Main St., Bennington
Thursday October 1, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM Faith and Fantastic Fiction Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Laura Clerkin   869-2409   
    Hobbits? The Hunger Games? Travelers to Narnia, Neverland, Wonderland, the Long Earth? Curious about the religious dimensions of Twilight, The Golden Compass or The Graveyard Book? This discussion with Maren Tirabassi on the connection between fiction and the spiritual imagination touches on classics and bestsellers as participants of all ages are invited to share their reflections and favorite books.
    Location: Bethlehem Public Library, 2245 Main St., Bethlehem
 
misc_none 6:30 PM New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carol Riley   745-8159   
    Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.
    Location: Lincoln Public Library, 22 Church St., Lincoln
Saturday October 3, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 2:00 PM That Reminds Me of a Story Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Barbara Lerch   659-3850   
    Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity. Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place. She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own.
    Location: Newmarket Public Library, 1 Elm St., Newmarket
Monday October 5, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Brewing in New Hampshire: An Informal History of Beer in the Granite State Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Betsy Solon   642-3355   
    Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era. Illustrations present evidence of society's changing attitudes towards beer and alcohol consumption over the years. Whether you're a beer connoisseur or a "tea-totaler", this lecture will be enjoyed by adults of all ages.
    Location: Mary E. Bartlett Library, 22 Dalton Rd., Brentwood
 
misc_none 7:30 PM 12,000 Years Ago in the Granite State Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Tom Talpey   495-3284   
    The native Abenaki people played a central role in the history of the Monadnock region, defending it against English settlement and forcing the abandonment of Keene and other Monadnock area towns during the French and Indian Wars. Despite this, little is known about the Abenaki, and conventional histories often depict the first Europeans entering an untamed, uninhabited wilderness, rather than the homeland of people who had been there for hundreds of generations. Robert Goodby discusses how the real depth of Native history was revealed when an archaeological study prior to construction of the new Keene Middle School discovered traces of four structures dating to the end of the Ice Age. Undisturbed for 12,000 years, the site revealed information about the economy, gender roles, and household organization of the Granite State's very first inhabitants, as well as evidence of social networks that extended for hundreds of miles across northern New England. POTLUCK SUPPER BEGINS AT 6:00PM. VISITORS ARE WELCOME TO BRING A DISH AND JOIN THE GATHERING AT ANY TIME.
    Location: Camp Morgan Lodge, 339 Millen Pond Rd., Washington
Tuesday October 6, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM That Reminds Me of a Story Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Marilyn Semple   895-4536   
    Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity. Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place. She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own.
    Location: Regional Economic Development Center, 57 Main St., Raymond
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misc_none 7:00 PM A History of Native Burial Looting, Destruction & Protection in NH Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Bartlett Public Library   374-2755   
    The history of Native American site desecration and looting in the Americas is well known. New Hampshire has its share of similar stories, but the valuing and protection of these historic sites in NH did not just begin with the passage of a Native burial protection law in the early 1990s. In the 1820s the "giant by the lake," the remains of an Abenaki man found in Melvin Village on Lake Winnipesaukee, was carefully reburied near his original burial location. John and Donna Moody explore the history of burial and site destruction, repatriation, and site protection in the Granite State.
    Location: Bartlett Public Library, 1313 US Rte 302, Bartlett
Wednesday October 7, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Amy Inglis   664-9715   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Barrington Public Library, 105 Ramsdell Ln., Barrington
Thursday October 8, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Liberty Is Our Motto!: Songs and Stories of the Hutchinson Family Singers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Brianna Sullivan   382-6011   
    The year is 1876, and New Hampshire's own John Hutchinson sings and tells about his famous musical family "straight from the horse's mouth." Originally from Milford, NH, the Hutchinson Family Singers were among America's most notable musical entertainers for much of the mid-19th century. They achieved international recognition with songs advancing social reform and political causes such as abolition, temperance, women's suffrage, and the Lincoln presidential campaign of 1860. In this living history program, Steve Blunt portrays John Hutchinson. He tells the Hutchinsons' story and shares their music with lyrics provided. Audience members are invited to sing along on "The Old Granite State," "Get Off the Track," "Tenting on the Old Campground," and more.
    Location: Plaistow Public Library, 85 Main St., Plaistow
 
misc_none 6:30 PM New Hampshire's One-Room Rural Schools: The Romance and the Reality Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Robert Gustafson   553-0531   
    Hundreds of one-room schools dotted the landscape of New Hampshire a century ago and were the backbone of primary education for generations of children. Revered in literature and lore, they actually were beset with problems, some of which are little changed today. The greatest issue was financing the local school and the vast differences between taxing districts in ability to support education. Other concerns included teacher preparation and quality, curriculum, discipline, student achievement and community involvement in the educational process. Steve Taylor explores the lasting legacies of the one-room school and how they echo today.
    Location: Kimball Public Library, 5 Academy Avenue, Atkinson
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Imperial Russian Fabergé Eggs Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Portsmouth Athenaeum   431-2538   
    This illustrated presentation by Marina Forbes focuses on the life and remarkable work of Russian master jeweler and artist, Peter Carl Fabergé. The program features a photo-tour of Fabergé collections at the Constantine Palace in St. Petersburg and from major museums and private collectors around the world. Explore the important role of egg painting in Russian culture and the development of this major Russian art form from a traditional craft to the level of exquisite fine art under the patronage of the tsars. Forbes also discusses the fascinating history of these eggs, their role in the dramatic events of the last decades of Romanov rule in Russia, and in the years following the Bolshevik Revolution.
    Location: Portsmouth Athenaeum, 6 Market Square, Portsmouth
 
misc_none 7:00 PM The Middle East Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Wolfeboro Public Library   569-2428   
    The term "Middle East" is a changing geopolitical concept. Throughout recent history, this term referred to a political, a cultural, and a geographical region with no clear boundaries. Moreover, this concept serves to generate stereotypes and misunderstanding. This multimedia presentation by Mohamed Defaa provides an analytical framework to understand the histories, social identities, and cultures behind this complex concept of "Middle East."
    Location: Wolfeboro Public Library, 259 S. Main St., Wolfeboro
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Witches, Pop Culture, and the Past Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Caitlin Stevens   472-2300   
    "Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.
    Location: Bedford Public Library, 3 Meetinghouse Rd., Bedford
 
misc_none 7:15 PM Brewing in New Hampshire: An Informal History of Beer in the Granite State Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Donna Denniston   496-5462   
    Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era. Illustrations present evidence of society's changing attitudes towards beer and alcohol consumption over the years. Whether you're a beer connoisseur or a "tea-totaler", this lecture will be enjoyed by adults of all ages.
    Location: Springfield Town Meetinghouse, 23 Four Corners Rd., Springfield
Tuesday October 13, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Baked Beans and Fried Clams: How Food Defines A Region Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Tasha Leroux Stetson   364-2400   
    Baked Beans, fried clams, fish chowder, Indian pudding - so many foods are distinctive to New England. This talk offers a celebration of these regional favorites along with an examination of how contemporary life has distanced us from these classics. What makes them special and how do these foods define our region? Edie Clark draws from such diverse resources as Fannie Farmer, Julia Child, and Haydn S. Pearson for enlightenment and amusement as well as on her own experiences, writing and traveling for Yankee magazine over the past thirty years to places where baked beans are still featured prominently on the menu.
    Location: Gilmanton Year-Round Library, 1385 NH Rte. 140, Gilmanton Iron Works
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jan Cote   783-4090   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Elkins Public Library, 9 Center Rd., Canterbury
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Native American History of New Hampshire: Beyond Boundaries, circa 1700-1850 Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Ric Erickson   749-9011   
    The northern frontier of New England was a risky place during the Colonial Period. Maine was nearly lost due to a series of Indian wars. New Hampshire only succeeded in settling the coast and as the frontier moved inland, both settlers and Indians found that their cultures had changed. Another set of wars to wrest Canada away from the French gave rise to several attempts by the Indians to assert their autonomy and stewardship over the land. By the time of Ethan Allen Crawford, the New Hampshire frontier had become a place for reflection on a new relationship with the environment, and tourism into the mountains was born. David Stewart-Smith muses that as the "last" Indians died off in the 1830s, perhaps a legacy was born that would insure a place for the landscape and the spirit of the Indians in New Hampshire's future.
    Location: Madbury Town Hall, 13 Town Hall Rd., Madbury
 
misc_none 7:15 PM The Shaker Legacy Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jane Rice   476-8895   
    In their more than two and a half centuries of existence, members of the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, commonly known as Shakers, made ingenious contributions to diverse fields: agriculture, industry, medicine, music, furniture design, women's rights, racial equality, craftsmanship, social and religious thought, and mechanical invention and improvement. Darryl Thompson explores some of these contributions in his lecture and shares some of his personal memories of the Canterbury Shakers. THE MONTHLY MOULTONBOROUGH HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING WILL BEGIN AT 7:00PM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 7:15PM.
    Location: Moultonborough Public Library, 4 Holland St.., Moultonborough
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Wednesday October 14, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM (Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Wilton Public & Gregg Free Library   654-2581   
    The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan's presentation explores the origins of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.
    Location: Wilton Public & Gregg Free Library, 7 Forest Rd., Wilton
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Digging Into Native History in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Charles Brault   878-1105   
    The native Abenaki people played a central role in the history of the Monadnock region, defending it against English settlement and forcing the abandonment of Keene and other Monadnock area towns during the French and Indian Wars. Despite this, little is known about the Abenaki, and conventional histories often depict the first Europeans entering an untamed, uninhabited wilderness, rather than the homeland of people who had been there for hundreds of generations. Robert Goodby discusses how the real depth of Native history was revealed when an archaeological study prior to construction of the new Keene Middle School discovered traces of four structures dating to the end of the Ice Age. Undisturbed for 12,000 years, the site revealed information about the economy, gender roles, and household organization of the Granite State's very first inhabitants, as well as evidence of social networks that extended for hundreds of miles across northern New England.
    Location: Chamberlin Free Public Library, 46 Main St., Greenville
 
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Paul Memorial Library   778-8169   
    Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire
    Location: Paul Memorial Library, 76 Main St., Newfields
Thursday October 15, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Abraham and Mary Lincoln: The Long and the Short of It Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Andover Historical Society   735-5369   
    Distinctly different paths led Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd to Springfield, Illinois, where they met, married and began a family. The years that followed their move to the White House were filled with personal and national crises. Steve and Sharon Wood portray President and Mrs. Lincoln in this living history program, telling stories of their early lives and the challenges they faced during this turbulent time in our country's history.
    Location: East Andover Grange, Franklin Hwy/Chase Hill Rd., East Andover
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Wendy Pelletier   745-9971   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: Woodstock Town Office Bldg., 165 Lost River Rd., N. Woodstock
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Witches, Pop Culture, and the Past Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Merrimack Public Library (Adult Services)   424-5021   
    "Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.
    Location: Merrimack Public Library, 470 Daniel Webster Hwy, Merrimack
Friday October 16, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:30 PM New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Alan Rumrill   446-7447   
    Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.
    Location: Stoddard Town Hall, 1450 Route 123 North, Stoddard
Saturday October 17, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 1:00 PM Crosscut: The Mills, Logging and Life on the Androscoggin Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Canaan Town Library   523-9650   
    Using oral histories, Rebecca Rule recreates the voices of North Country people and uses new and vintage photos to tell the story of logging, the Berlin Mills, and life in the Androscoggin Valley, from the beginnings of the logging industry in the 1800s, through the boom years of the Brown Company and subsequent mill owners, and on to the demolition of the stacks in 2007. Audience members will be invited to share their own stories and discuss the logging and paper industries and the special place north of the notches. John Rule assists with a PowerPoint presentation of photos and information from his own research into the history of the Brown Company as an archivist at the New Hampshire Historical Society.
    Location: Canaan Town Library, 1173 US Rte. 4, Canaan
Sunday October 18, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 2:00 PM The Shaker Legacy Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Whipple Free Library   487-3391   
    In their more than two and a half centuries of existence, members of the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, commonly known as Shakers, made ingenious contributions to diverse fields: agriculture, industry, medicine, music, furniture design, women's rights, racial equality, craftsmanship, social and religious thought, and mechanical invention and improvement. Darryl Thompson explores some of these contributions in his lecture and shares some of his personal memories of the Canterbury Shakers.
    Location: Whipple Free Library, 67 Mont Vernon Rd., New Boston
Monday October 19, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Caesar: The Man from Venus Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Kate Thomas   585-6503   
    Meet Caesar, who is descended from the Goddess Venus. This program introduces Caesar as a young boy living with his Mother, Aurelia, and his Aunt Julia; two women who will shape the boy who will be the most powerful man on earth. Using a rich variety of texts, Sebastian Lockwood shows Caesar as a man who clearly saw his destiny and fulfilled that destiny with the help of remarkable women - Cleopatra amongst them. A poet, historian, linguist, architect, general, politician, and engineer, was he truly of the Populi party for the People of Roma? Or a despot and tyrant? This performance shows Caesar as a remarkable genius who transformed his world in ways that still resonate today.
    Location: Fitzwilliam Town Library, 11 Templeton Tpk., Fitzwilliam
Tuesday October 20, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jessica Sheehan   497-2102   
    Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.
    Location: Goffstown Public Library, 2 High St., Goffstown
 
misc_none 7:30 PM Only in America: History and Health Care in the United States Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Erica Boynton   323-7591   
    Allen Koop describes how the troubled, promising, and unique American health care system has been shaped, not only by developments in medicine, but also by by social forces, economic trends, party politics, and by historical surprises. The lecture moves rapidly from Colonial times, through era of sectarian medicine, then the accomplishments of modern medicine, and concludes in the health care tensions of the 21st century. THIS IS HELD IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE 250TH ANNIVERSARY OF TOWN OF TAMWORTH.
    Location: Remick County Doctor Museum & Farm, 58 Cleveland Hill Rd., Tamworth
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Wednesday October 21, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 1:00 PM Witches, Pop Culture, and the Past Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Betty Darling   429-1315   
    "Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.
    Location: Litchfield Community Church, 259 Charles Bancroft Hwy., Litchfield
 
misc_none 6:00 PM Town by Town, Watershed by Watershed: Native Americans in NH Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Denise Jensen   752-5210   
    Every town and watershed in New Hampshire has ancient and continuing Native American history. From the recent, late 20th century explosion of local Native population in New Hampshire back to the era of early settlement and the colonial wars, John and Donna Moody explore the history of New Hampshire's Abenaki and Penacook peoples with a focus on your local community.
    Location: White Mountains Community College Fortier Library, 2020 Riverside Dr., Berlin
 
misc_none 6:30 PM (Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Eric Stern   679-8484   
    The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan's presentation explores the origins of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.
    Location: Blaisdell Memorial Library, 129 Stage Rd., Nottingham
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Theresa DiLuzio   352-3995   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Swanzey Town Hall, 620 Old Homestead Hwy, Swanzey
 
misc_none 7:00 PM That Reminds Me of a Story Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Rodgers Memorial Library   886-6030   
    Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity. Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place. She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own.
    Location: Rodgers Memorial Library, 194 Derry Rd., Hudson
Thursday October 22, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM A House on the Bay: Life on 17th-Century New Hampshire's Coastal Frontier Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Roland Garland   968-3902   
    One of the Great Bay's most prominent families during the latter part of the 17th century was the Wiggin family. Recently, a team of archaeologists discovered the home of Thomas Wiggin, Jr. Neill DePaoli demonstrates how bay residents on the periphery of Anglo-American settlement were far less isolated and bereft of the comforts of the more "civilized" world than traditionally portrayed.
    Location: School House Museum, 94 Dane Rd., Rte 25B, Center Harbor
 
misc_none 7:00 PM A Visit with Abraham Lincoln Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Dee Cleary   483-2686   
    Abraham Lincoln, portrayed by Steve Wood, begins this program by recounting his early life and ends with a reading of the "Gettysburg Address." Along the way he comments on the debates with Stephen Douglas, his run for the presidency, and the Civil War.
    Location: Auburn Historical Association Museum, 102 Hooksett Rd., Auburn
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Tanya Griffith   465-7721   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Lawrence Barn, 28 Depot Rd., Hollis
Friday October 23, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Motivating the WWII Home Front via Magazine and Radio Advertising Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Oscar Foss Memorial Library   269-3900   
    Magazine ads and radio commercials aimed at the home front were used extensively during WWII to explain shortages, encourage support of wartime restrictions, increase bond sales, request recycling of strategic materials, boost morale, and suggest ways to support our troops. Calvin Knickerbocker uses over 50 period magazine ads and radio commercials to illustrate the concerted effort by which the U.S. government fostered these aims. Never before or since has the US used the media so effectively to support a wartime effort.
    Location: Barnstead Town Hall, 108 S. Barnstead Rd., Center Barnstead
Sunday October 25, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 2:00 PM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carolyn Hoague   463-7466   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: Deerfield Town Hall, 10 Church St., Deerfield
 
misc_none 3:00 PM The Old Man of the Mountain: Substance and Symbol Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Don Brown   887-3842   
    The story of the Old Man of the Mountain in Franconia Notch is a story of New Hampshire itself, reflecting history, the arts, literature, geography, philosophy and public policy. Maggie Stier's illustrated talk reveals the ways that this iconic place has sparked observers' imaginations, attracted intense personal commitment, and symbolized changing public sentiment. Stier details the threats to the Old Man and Franconia Notch that led to protection as a State Park and, later, to the construction of the Franconia Notch Parkway. She concludes with an analysis of what caused the fall of the Old Man in 2003, a summary of private efforts to create a memorial, and a discussion of how this unique natural phenomenon may be remembered by future generations. The audience is invited to bring souvenirs, memorabilia or other artifacts of the Old Man of the Mountain for a shared display before and after the program, and to share their own experiences and memories on this topic.
    Location: Stevens Hall, 1 Chester St., Chester
Monday October 26, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Brewing in New Hampshire: An Informal History of Beer in the Granite State Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Hampton Falls Free Library   926-3682   
    Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era. Illustrations present evidence of society's changing attitudes towards beer and alcohol consumption over the years. Whether you're a beer connoisseur or a "tea-totaler", this lecture will be enjoyed by adults of all ages.
    Location: Hampton Falls Free Library, 7 Drinkwater Rd., Hampton Falls
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misc_none 7:00 PM New England: Myth or Reality? Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: J.A. Tarbell Library   654-6790   
    The six states known as New England have been romanticized in art and literature for more than 200 years, creating a reality that is touched by myth. How has this myth-making affected the region? Edie Clark, a longtime writer for Yankee magazine, focuses on the work of Robert Frost, Norman Rockwell, Wallace Nutting, and more recently, Yankee magazine. These and others have created such a distinct picture of New England that even the current inhabitants of the region have a hard time knowing whether what they see all around them is real or imagined.
    Location: J.A. Tarbell Library, 136 Forest Rd., Lyndeborough
Thursday October 29, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM New Hampshire Cemeteries and Gravestones Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Laura Clerkin   869-2409   
    Rubbings, photographs, and slides illustrate the rich variety of gravestones to be found in our own neighborhoods, but they also tell long-forgotten stories of such historical events as the Great Awakening, the Throat Distemper epidemic, and the American Revolution. Find out more about these deeply personal works of art and the craftsmen who carved them with Glenn Knoblock, and learn how to read the stone "pages" that give insight into the vast genealogical book of New Hampshire.
    Location: Bethlehem Public Library, 2245 Main St., Bethlehem
 
misc_none 6:30 PM Lizzie Borden Took an Axe, Or Did She? Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Gilford Public Library   524-6042   
    In 1892 Lizzie Borden, a 32-year-old single woman, was officially charged with the murder of her father and stepmother in Fall River, Massachusetts. The events that followed the murder would stir the curiosity of people across the nation. After four official criminal proceedings, Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the murder but the case was not officially reinvestigated by the authorities. To this day the case of Lizzie Borden is a mystery that has inspired television movies, documentaries, cinematic offerings, plays, musicals, poems, websites, blogs, a scholarly journal, college courses, and law school case studies. Annette Holba reviews the facts of the case and explores the evidence that some experts suggest points to Lizzie's guilt and others believe points to Lizzie's innocence. Lizzie's connections to New Hampshire are also discussed.
    Location: Gilford Public Library, 31 Potter Hill Rd., Gilford
Friday October 30, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Witches, Pop Culture, and the Past Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Joy B. Nowell   938-6054   
    "Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.
    Location: Center Meeting House, 927 Rte. 103 (intersection of Rte 103 & Rte 103A), Newbury
Tuesday November 3, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Mary Ann Moran   654-7415   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: Wilton Public & Gregg Free Library, 7 Forest Rd., Wilton
Wednesday November 4, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 11:00 AM Mary Todd Lincoln: Wife and Widow Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Andrea Lee   434-4073   
    Living historian Sally Mummey portrays Mary Todd Lincoln as she muses on her life from her dreams as a girl to her years as First Lady during the Civil War. Mrs. Lincoln shares stories of her life with President Lincoln and the events of that evening in Ford's Theatre when the assassin's bullet not only changed the course of the nation but destroyed her life as well. From the opulence of the White House to the dregs of obscurity, Mrs. Lincoln lived out her life struggling with affliction and tragedy. With wit and heartbreak, seasoned with abiding love for her husband and her children, Mrs. Lincoln reveals the passionate humanity of a misunderstood woman.
    Location: Marion Gerrish Community Ctr., 39 West Broadway, Derry
 
misc_none 6:30 PM Digging Into Native History in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Wendy Roberts   679-8484   
    Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth's surface.
    Location: Blaisdell Memorial Library, 129 Stage Rd., Nottingham
 
misc_none 7:00 PM That Reminds Me of a Story Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Paul Memorial Library   778-8169   
    Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity. Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place. She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own.
    Location: Paul Memorial Library, 76 Main St., Newfields
Friday November 6, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Our National Thanksgiving: With Thanks to President Lincoln and Mrs. Hale Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Claremont Opera House   542-0064   
    Sarah Josepha Hale, a Newport, NH native, tells the story of her 30 year effort to have Thanksgiving declared a national holiday. President Abraham Lincoln enters at the end of her tale to read his 1863 Thanksgiving proclamation. Sharon Wood portrays Hale and Steve Wood portrays Lincoln in a living history presentation following background about their characters and the times.
    Location: Claremont Opera House, 58 Opera House Square, Claremont
 
misc_none 7:00 PM The Great Sheep Boom and Its Enduring Legacy on the New Hampshire Landscape Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Anita Carroll-Weldon   352-0460   
    In a brief 30-year period in the early 19th century the New Hampshire countryside became home to hundreds of thousands of sheep. Production of wool became a lucrative business, generating fortunes and providing the only time of true agricultural prosperity in the state's history. It left behind a legacy of fine architecture and thousands of miles of rugged stonewalls. Steve Taylor discusses how farmers overcame enormous challenges to make sheep husbandry succeed, but forces from beyond New Hampshire were to doom the industry, with social consequences that would last a century. THIS PROGRAM WILL BE PART OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE 200TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FAULKNER & COLONY WOOLEN MILL LOCATED IN KEENE. IT WILL EXPAND UPON THE EXHIBIT ON THE HISTORY OF THE MILL AT THE MUSEUM FROM MAY 1 THROUGH OCTOBER 15.
    Location: Horatio Colony House Museum, 199 Main St., Keene
Saturday November 7, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM Digging Into Native History in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Cynthia Phillips   863-6921   
    Abenaki history has been reduced to near-invisibility as a result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on the Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go "underground," concealing their true identities for generations to avoid discrimination and persecution. Robert Goodby reveals archaeological evidence that shows their deep presence here, inches below the earth's surface.
    Location: Olive G. Pettis Library, 36 Mill Village Rd. (Rte 10 North), Goshen
Monday November 9, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM 12,000 Years Ago in the Granite State Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carol Eyman   589-4610   
    The native Abenaki people played a central role in the history of the Monadnock region, defending it against English settlement and forcing the abandonment of Keene and other Monadnock area towns during the French and Indian Wars. Despite this, little is known about the Abenaki, and conventional histories often depict the first Europeans entering an untamed, uninhabited wilderness, rather than the homeland of people who had been there for hundreds of generations. Robert Goodby discusses how the real depth of Native history was revealed when an archaeological study prior to construction of the new Keene Middle School discovered traces of four structures dating to the end of the Ice Age. Undisturbed for 12,000 years, the site revealed information about the economy, gender roles, and household organization of the Granite State's very first inhabitants, as well as evidence of social networks that extended for hundreds of miles across northern New England. ANNUAL MEETING WILL TAKE PLACE AT 6:45PM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 7:00PM.
    Location: Nashua Public Library, 2 Court St., Nashua
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misc_none 7:00 PM Petticoat Patriot: A Woman in the Continental Army Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Pam Dziama   772-4118   
    Joan Gatturna presents this living history program on Deborah Sampson, a patriot who left her petticoats behind. Disguised as a young man, she enlisted in the Continental Army during the American Revolution and served undetected for 17 months. She broke ground in her middle years when, as a wife and mother, she embarked on a lecture tour relating her war experiences. She became the first woman to be awarded an honorable discharge from an American Army and the first woman to be awarded a military pension for enlisted service.
    Location: Stratham Fire Station (Morgena Rm), 4 Winnicutt Rd., Stratham
Tuesday November 10, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Our National Thanksgiving: With Thanks to President Lincoln and Mrs. Hale Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Clara Sheehy   526-4275   
    Sarah Josepha Hale, a Newport, NH native, tells the story of her 30 year effort to have Thanksgiving declared a national holiday. President Abraham Lincoln enters at the end of her tale to read his 1863 Thanksgiving proclamation. Sharon Wood portrays Hale and Steve Wood portrays Lincoln in a living history presentation following background about their characters and the times.
    Location: New London Historical Society Meetinghouse, 179 Little Sunapee Rd., New London
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Pleasures of the Parlor: Middle-class Domestic Music-making in 19th-century New England Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jan Cote   783-4090   
    In 1904, 150 delegates to the National Piano Dealers' convention waved lights and danced around a bonfire made of hundreds of square pianos. Why? What's a square piano? How had middle-class Americans, their instruments and their songs changed over the preceding decades? Marya Danihel discusses music made at home in pre-Victorian and Victorian New England, illustrating her social and music history with live performances of songs from 19th-century collections, contemporary paintings and illustrations, and excerpts from etiquette books and memoirs like those of Portsmouth's Sarah Parker Rice Goodwin, wife of New Hampshire's Civil War governor.
    Location: Elkins Public Library, 9 Center Rd., Canterbury
 
misc_none 7:00 PM The Ballad Lives! Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Beverly Glynn   893-8882   
    Murder and mayhem, robbery and rapine, love that cuts to the bone: American ballads re-tell the wrenching themes of their English and Scottish cousins. Transplanted in the new world by old world immigrants, the traditional story-song of the Anglos and Scots wound up reinvigorated in the mountains of Appalachia and along the Canadian border. John Perrault talks, sings, and picks the strings that bind the old ballads to the new.
    Location: Salem Historical Museum, 310 Main St., Salem
Thursday November 12, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM (Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Erin Kennedy   673-3330   
    The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan's presentation explores the origins of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.
    Location: Brookline Public Library, 16 Main St., Brookline
 
misc_none 7:00 PM A Woman That Keeps Good Orders: Women, Tavern Keeping, and Public Approval Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carol Brock   547-2730   
    Government regulations, licensing, handling drunks, controlling the flow of information --why would the Colonial-era government allow women to run a tavern? When her husband died in 1736, Ann Jose Harvey became the owner of a prominent Portsmouth tavern and sole guardian of seven small children. For at least twenty years, Harvey ran the increasingly prosperous establishment. Using documents related to Harvey's venue, Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores the world of female tavern keepers. A tavern was potentially the most disruptive spot in town. Why would a woman want to keep one?
    Location: Francestown Town Offices (In Back), 27 Main St., Francestown
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Baked Beans and Fried Clams: How Food Defines A Region Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Rochester Historical Society   330-3099   
    Baked Beans, fried clams, fish chowder, Indian pudding - so many foods are distinctive to New England. This talk offers a celebration of these regional favorites along with an examination of how contemporary life has distanced us from these classics. What makes them special and how do these foods define our region? Edie Clark draws from such diverse resources as Fannie Farmer, Julia Child, and Haydn S. Pearson for enlightenment and amusement as well as on her own experiences, writing and traveling for Yankee magazine over the past thirty years to places where baked beans are still featured prominently on the menu.
    Location: Rochester Historical Society Museum, 58 Hanson St., Rochester
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Benedict Arnold: Patriot and Traitor? Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Erin Robb   239-8918   
    We all think we know the story of Benedict Arnold, the American Revolutionary War general who fought for the Continental Army but then defected to the British. Recalled mainly as a traitor for his 1780 defection, Arnold had risked his life and fortune for American freedom in courageous exploits between 1775 and 1778, when the dream of independence was at its most fragile. As an officer in the Continental Army, Arnold ably led American forces in desperate circumstances - against impossible odds, in a blinding snowstorm, through a howling wilderness, and against the extraordinary might of the Royal Navy. George Morrison will take you on a journey through New England, Canada and New York tracing the complex story of this infamous American icon.
    Location: VFW Post 3968, 35 Main St., Winchester
Sunday November 15, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 2:00 PM Our National Thanksgiving: With Thanks to President Lincoln and Mrs. Hale Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Hampton Historical Society   929-0781   
    Sarah Josepha Hale, a Newport, NH native, tells the story of her 30 year effort to have Thanksgiving declared a national holiday. President Abraham Lincoln enters at the end of her tale to read his 1863 Thanksgiving proclamation. Sharon Wood portrays Hale and Steve Wood portrays Lincoln in a living history presentation following background about their characters and the times.
    Location: St. James Masonic Lodge, 77 Tide Mill Rd., Hampton
Wednesday November 18, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM 12,000 Years Ago in the Granite State Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Polly Cote   673-1946   
    The native Abenaki people played a central role in the history of the Monadnock region, defending it against English settlement and forcing the abandonment of Keene and other Monadnock area towns during the French and Indian Wars. Despite this, little is known about the Abenaki, and conventional histories often depict the first Europeans entering an untamed, uninhabited wilderness, rather than the homeland of people who had been there for hundreds of generations. Robert Goodby discusses how the real depth of Native history was revealed when an archaeological study prior to construction of the new Keene Middle School discovered traces of four structures dating to the end of the Ice Age. Undisturbed for 12,000 years, the site revealed information about the economy, gender roles, and household organization of the Granite State's very first inhabitants, as well as evidence of social networks that extended for hundreds of miles across northern New England.
    Location: Milford Town Hall Bnqt Rm. (Side Ent. on Middle St., Take Elevator to 3rd Fl.), 1 Union Sq., Milford
Thursday November 19, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM From Seed to Tree: Growing Memories into Stories Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Stephen Ullman   588-2005   
    What makes a good story? Often our best memories come out as sketchy anecdotes. How do we develop those funny or poignant moments into full, shapely stories to delight listeners or readers? In this active workshop participants will experiment with a toolbox of practical storytelling techniques to make their stories more vivid and engaging. By the end, each person will have more awareness of how stories are shaped - as well as a new story to tell. Recommended time frame: 1 ½ to 2 hours.
    Location: First Presbyterian Church, 73 Main St., Antrim
Wednesday December 2, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carol Brock   547-2730   
    Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.
    Location: Francestown Town Offices (In Back), 27 Main St., Francestown
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Thursday December 10, 2015 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM On This Spot Once Stood... Remembering the Architectural Heritage of New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carl Schmidt   353-9307   
    New Hampshire has lost many of its important historic buildings to fire, neglect, intentional demolition and re-development. In some cases, a plaque or marker provides a physical reminder of what was, but in other examples, no tangible evidence remains. Maggie Stier showcases some of the celebrated buildings that New Hampshire has lost, and explores how and why we remember and commemorate those losses. Her program will draw from historical and contemporary photographs, maps, and other historical records to explore the significance of these structures, explain their eventual fate, and analyze popular responses to the loss. Particular attention will be devoted to places where a building was memorialized in some way. Examples in this illustrated talk will include the simple wooden signs where the hotels in Bethlehem once stood, a large-scale installation of architectural fragments in Concord, and the birthplaces of several notable citizens. Audiences will be challenged to think about other examples, and consider the ways in which we remember what isn't there any longer.
    Location: Rivendell Academy, 2972 Rte.25A, Orford
Thursday January 14, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 1:00 PM That Reminds Me of a Story Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Lee Arthur   964-6281   
    Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity. Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place. She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own.
    Location: Rye Congregational Church, 580 Washington Rd., Rye
Friday January 15, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 10:15 AM Wacky Songs that Made Us Laugh Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Gayle Hylen   659-2422   
    Popular songs with humorous lyrics have kept us laughing since Colonial times. We need comic relief, and songs provide some of the best (sometimes unintentionally). Excerpts from hilarious songs help chart the evolution of musical humor from the 1920s to the 1980s. Selections poke fun at WW II enemies, diets, television, sex, Christmas, summer camp, religion, and many other aspects of life. Laugh as you recall wacky moments from the past and discover new ones with Calvin Knickerbocker. THERE WILL BE COFFEE & CONVERSATION PRIOR TO PROGRAM BEGINNING AT 9 AM. A SHORT BUSINESS MEETING WILL START AT 10 AM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 10:15 AM.
    Location: Community Church of Durham, 17 Main St., Durham
Thursday January 28, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carl Schmidt   353-9307   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Rivendell Academy, 2972 Rte.25A, Orford
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Bradford Historical Society   938-5372   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: The Tin Shop, 160 East Main St., Bradford
Saturday March 12, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Your Hit Parade: Twenty-five Years Presenting America's Top Popular Songs Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carl Schmidt   353-9307   
    "Your Hit Parade" aired on radio and then on television from 1935 to 1959. It set the standard for American popular music. Calvin Knickerbocker outlines a quarter century of the show's history as a "tastemaker" featuring songs inspired by the Great Depression and on through the advent of rock and roll. He explores the show's relationship with sponsor American Tobacco and Lucky Strike cigarettes and shares stories about the artists the show helped launch and promote, from Frank Sinatra to Elvis. THIS EVENT IS HELD IN CONJUNCTION WITH AN ANNUAL "SOUP SUPPER".THE SUPPER IS A FUNDRAISING EVENT. THE SUPPER WILL TAKE PLACE FROM 5:30 - 6:45PM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 7:00PM.
    Location: United Congregational Church of Orford, NH Rte. 10, Orford
Monday March 14, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire's Grange Movement: Its Rise, Triumphs and Decline Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Pam Dziama   772-4118   
    Much of rural New Hampshire in the late 19th century was locked in a downward spiral of population decline, abandonment of farms, reversion of cleared land to forest and widespread feelings of melancholy and loss. The development of the Grange movement in the 1880s and 1890s was aided greatly by hunger for social interaction, entertainment and mutual support. As membership surged it became a major force in policymaking in Concord, and its agenda aligned closely with the Progressive politics that swept the state in early 20th century. Many Grange initiatives became law, placing the state at the leading edge in several areas of reform. Steve Taylor analyzes the rapid social and economic changes that would eventually force the steep decline of the once-powerful movement. Attendees are welcome to bring along any Grange related items. PLEASE NOTE THE SNOW DATE FOR THIS PROGRAM IS 3/21/16.
    Location: Stratham Fire Station (Morgena Rm), 4 Winnicutt Rd., Stratham
Tuesday March 15, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Imperial Russian Fabergé Eggs Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Patty Lenza   305-0875   
    This illustrated presentation by Marina Forbes focuses on the life and remarkable work of Russian master jeweler and artist, Peter Carl Fabergé. The program features a photo-tour of Fabergé collections at the Constantine Palace in St. Petersburg and from major museums and private collectors around the world. Explore the important role of egg painting in Russian culture and the development of this major Russian art form from a traditional craft to the level of exquisite fine art under the patronage of the tsars. Forbes also discusses the fascinating history of these eggs, their role in the dramatic events of the last decades of Romanov rule in Russia, and in the years following the Bolshevik Revolution.
    Location: St. Elizabeth Seton Church Basement, 190 Meetinghouse Rd., Bedford
Wednesday March 16, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 9:30 AM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Anne Krantz   673-9684   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: Messiah Lutheran Church, 303 Rte. 101, Amherst
Wednesday April 13, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Wacky Songs that Made Us Laugh Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Newton Historical Society   382-7574   
    Popular songs with humorous lyrics have kept us laughing since Colonial times. We need comic relief, and songs provide some of the best (sometimes unintentionally). Excerpts from hilarious songs help chart the evolution of musical humor from the 1920s to the 1980s. Selections poke fun at WW II enemies, diets, television, sex, Christmas, summer camp, religion, and many other aspects of life. Laugh as you recall wacky moments from the past and discover new ones with Calvin Knickerbocker.
    Location: Newton Town Hall, 2 Town Hall Rd., Newton
Thursday April 14, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 1:00 PM The Other Side of the Midnight Ride: A Visit with Rachel Revere Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Lee Arthur   964-6281   
    This living history program by Joan Gatturna tells a remarkable story of tea, trouble and revolution related by the woman who rode through life with Paul Revere. Rachel Revere tells of the Boston Tea Party, the Midnight Ride and the Siege of Boston. See these events through the eyes of a woman who engineered the escape of her family from occupied Boston and smuggled money to the Sons of Liberty. Meet the woman who kept the home fires burning while her husband fanned the flames of Revolution!
    Location: Rye Congregational Church, 580 Washington Rd., Rye
Friday April 15, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 10:15 AM I Can't Die But Once - Harriet Tubman's Civil War Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Gayle Hylen   659-2422   
    Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti's characterization of Harriet Tubman is a lucid, well-researched biography about the remarkable life of an enduring warrior. As Harriet Tubman, she weaves a tale of truth, pain, courage and determination in the quagmire of racial exploitation. The United States Government enlisted Tubman as a scout and spy for the Union cause and she battled courageously behind enemy lines during the Civil War, but Tubman is best known for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad. Though she is one of the most famous women in our nation's history, we have come to know her life through fictionalized biographies written for school children. Quezaire-Presutti separates reality from myth to reconstruct a richer and far more accurate historical account of Tubman's life. THERE WILL BE COFFEE & CONVERSATION PRIOR TO THE PROGRAM BEGINNING AT 9 AM, A SHORT BUSINESS MEETING AT 10 AM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 10:15 AM.
    Location: Community Church of Durham, 17 Main St., Durham
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Saturday April 16, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 2:00 PM Cows and Communities: How the Lowly Bovine Has Nurtured New Hampshire Through Four Centuries Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Susan Maclennan   868-2628   
    Cattle were essential to the survival of the earliest New Hampshire settlements, and their contributions have been central to the life and culture of the state ever since. From providing human dietary sustenance to basic motive power for agriculture, forestry and transport, bovines have had a deep and enduring bond with their keepers, one that lingers today and is a vital part of the iconography of rural New Hampshire, even as dairy farming becomes ever more reliant on intensive modern science and technology. Where are New Hampshire's cows today and what are are they doing? Steve Taylor provides answers -- some will prove surprising.
    Location: Durham Public Library, 49 Madbury Rd., Durham
Thursday April 21, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: David Moody   835-7900   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Third Congregational Church, 14 River St., Alstead
Friday May 6, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM A Night of Music with Two Old Friends Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jean Latham   382-5843   
    Over the centuries immigrants from the British Isles have come to the Americas bringing with them their musical styles and tastes as well as their instruments. With the concertina, bodhran, mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo, Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast sing and play this traditional Celtic music, but they also perform American country music in the way it was conceived in the early twentieth century. Through stories, songs and instrumental melodies, they demonstrate how old time American mountain tunes are often derived directly from the songs of the Irish, yet are influenced by other cultural groups to create a new American sound.
    Location: First Baptist Church, 122 Main St., Plaistow
Tuesday May 10, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 3:00 PM Margaret Bourke-White, America's Eyes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Mary Pease   465-3501   
    Did you know that photographer Margaret Bourke-White had to make Stalin laugh to get his picture, and she was told by Patton to hide his jowls? Letters and tender WWII-era V-mails found at Syracuse University form the basis for this living history program. Sally Matson's lifetime in theatre began with acting and directing at Northwestern University, and her fascination with history provides the audience with an entertaining lesson.
    Location: Lawrence Barn, 28 Depot Rd., Hollis
Thursday May 12, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM (Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Wiggin Memorial Library   772-4346   
    The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan's presentation explores the origins of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.
    Location: Wiggin Memorial Library, 10 Bunker Hill Ave., Stratham
Wednesday May 18, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM George Washington Spied Here: Spies and Spying in the American Revolutionary War (1775 - 1783) Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Bill Earnshaw   472-3866   
    Based on recently discovered historical materials and recent books, this program by Douglas Wheeler is an inquiry into the life and death of America's first spy, the patriot-martyr, Nathan Hale, of Coventry, Connecticut. Wheeler takes audiences on a journey through the spy world of the Culper Spy Ring of New York, Long Island and Connecticut, the most secret of the American spy rings and the most successful in getting useful intelligence to General George Washington beginning in 1778, two years after Hale's tragic execution by the British. The Father of our country was also our first Intelligence Chief. The program is illustrated with images of the main places and dramatis personae of this unusual network of patriot secret agents and couriers.
    Location: Bedford Public Library, 3 Meetinghouse Rd., Bedford
Wednesday September 21, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Liberty Is Our Motto!: Songs and Stories of the Hutchinson Family Singers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sally Woodman   382-7574   
    The year is 1876, and New Hampshire's own John Hutchinson sings and tells about his famous musical family "straight from the horse's mouth." Originally from Milford, NH, the Hutchinson Family Singers were among America's most notable musical entertainers for much of the mid-19th century. They achieved international recognition with songs advancing social reform and political causes such as abolition, temperance, women's suffrage, and the Lincoln presidential campaign of 1860. In this living history program, Steve Blunt portrays John Hutchinson. He tells the Hutchinsons' story and shares their music with lyrics provided. Audience members are invited to sing along on "The Old Granite State," "Get Off the Track," "Tenting on the Old Campground," and more.
    Location: Newton Town Hall, 2 Town Hall Rd., Newton
 
misc_none 8:00 PM Banjos, Bones, and Ballads Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Bill Earnshaw   472-3866   
    Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner. THE BEDFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY WILL HOLD IT'S ANNUAL MEETING AT 6:30 PM WITH SOCIAL TIME, 7:00 PM IS A CATERED DINNER WITH MEETING. PROGRAM WILL FOLLOW AT 8:00 PM.
    Location: Bedford Town Hall, 1 Meetinghouse Rd., Bedford
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