Link to New Hampshire Humanities Council Home Page

Calendar of Events

EventKeeper, your web calendar solution, has some questions about your browser.
Please click here.
[Home Page] Tell a Friend    Print Version    Help [Monthly Calendar View]
[Weekly Calendar View]
  
    Search for Events
Spacer Image
Monday February 15, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Bonny John   753-8576   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Boscawen Public Library, 116 North Main St., Boscawen
Tuesday February 16, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire’s Long Love-Hate Relationship with Its Agricultural Fairs Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jane Trombi   357-8540   
    The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam, and other "scandalous dimensions" that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint. Steve Taylor will discuss the ups and downs of the fairs down through years and how public affection for rural traditions helps them survive in contemporary times.
    Location: Walpole Town Hall, 34 Elm St., Walpole
Thursday February 18, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM If I am Not For Myself, Who Will Be for Me? George Washington's Runaway Slave Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Ruslyn Vear   673-2288   
    Oney Judge Staines, according to the Constitution, was only three-fifths of a person. To her masters, George and Martha Washington, she was merely "the girl." All she wanted was the freedom to control her own actions, but her account of escaping the Executive Mansion in Philadelphia, fleeing north and establishing a life in New Hampshire is not a typical runaway story. Portrayed by Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti, Oney's tale provides an alternative perspective on the new nation's social, political and economic development, from one whose personal experience so contradicted the promise of the principles embodied in the nation's founding documents.
    Location: Amherst Town Library, 14 Main St., Amherst
 
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire’s Long Love-Hate Relationship with Its Agricultural Fairs Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Margaret Ladd   272-4967   
    The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam and other "scandalous dimensions" that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint. Steve Taylor will discuss the ups and downs of the fairs down through years and how public affection for rural traditions helps them survive in contemporary times.
    Location: Piermont Old Church Building, 130 Rte. 10, Piermont
Monday February 29, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:30 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jim McLaughlin   456-3677   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Warner Town Hall, 5 East Main St., Warner
Tuesday March 1, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire's One-Room Rural Schools: The Romance and the Reality Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Laura Martin   778-2335   
    Hundreds of one-room schools dotted the landscape of New Hampshire a century ago and were the backbone of primary education for generations of children. Revered in literature and lore, they actually were beset with problems, some of which are little changed today. The greatest issue was financing the local school and the vast differences between taxing districts in ability to support education. Other concerns included teacher preparation and quality, curriculum, discipline, student achievement and community involvement in the educational process. Steve Taylor explores the lasting legacies of the one-room school and how they echo today.
    Location: Exeter Historical Society, 47 Front St., Exeter
Wednesday March 2, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 11:00 AM New Hampshire's One-Room Rural Schools: The Romance and the Reality Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Andrea H. Lee   434-4073   
    Hundreds of one-room schools dotted the landscape of New Hampshire a century ago and were the backbone of primary education for generations of children. Revered in literature and lore, they actually were beset with problems, some of which are little changed today. The greatest issue was financing the local school and the vast differences between taxing districts in ability to support education. Other concerns included teacher preparation and quality, curriculum, discipline, student achievement and community involvement in the educational process. Steve Taylor explores the lasting legacies of the one-room school and how they echo today.
    Location: Marion Gerrish Community Ctr., 39 West Broadway, Derry
Tuesday March 8, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM A Night of Music with Two Old Friends Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Beverly Glynn   893-8882   
    Over the centuries immigrants from the British Isles have come to the Americas bringing with them their musical styles and tastes as well as their instruments. With the concertina, bodhran, mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo, Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast sing and play this traditional Celtic music, but they also perform American country music in the way it was conceived in the early twentieth century. Through stories, songs and instrumental melodies, they demonstrate how old time American mountain tunes are often derived directly from the songs of the Irish, yet are influenced by other cultural groups to create a new American sound.
    Location: Salem Historical Museum, 310 Main St., Salem
Saturday March 12, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Your Hit Parade: Twenty-five Years Presenting America's Top Popular Songs Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carl Schmidt   353-9307   
    "Your Hit Parade" aired on radio and then on television from 1935 to 1959. It set the standard for American popular music. Calvin Knickerbocker outlines a quarter century of the show's history as a "tastemaker" featuring songs inspired by the Great Depression and on through the advent of rock and roll. He explores the show's relationship with sponsor American Tobacco and Lucky Strike cigarettes and shares stories about the artists the show helped launch and promote, from Frank Sinatra to Elvis. THIS EVENT IS HELD IN CONJUNCTION WITH AN ANNUAL "SOUP SUPPER".THE SUPPER IS A FUNDRAISING EVENT. THE SUPPER WILL TAKE PLACE FROM 5:30 - 6:45PM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 7:00PM.
    Location: United Congregational Church of Orford, NH Rte. 10, Orford
Monday March 14, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire's Grange Movement: Its Rise, Triumphs and Decline Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Pam Dziama   772-4118   
    Much of rural New Hampshire in the late 19th century was locked in a downward spiral of population decline, abandonment of farms, reversion of cleared land to forest and widespread feelings of melancholy and loss. The development of the Grange movement in the 1880s and 1890s was aided greatly by hunger for social interaction, entertainment and mutual support. As membership surged it became a major force in policymaking in Concord, and its agenda aligned closely with the Progressive politics that swept the state in early 20th century. Many Grange initiatives became law, placing the state at the leading edge in several areas of reform. Steve Taylor analyzes the rapid social and economic changes that would eventually force the steep decline of the once-powerful movement. Attendees are welcome to bring along any Grange related items. PLEASE NOTE THE SNOW DATE FOR THIS PROGRAM IS 3/21/16.
    Location: Stratham Fire Station (Morgena Rm), 4 Winnicutt Rd., Stratham
Tuesday March 15, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Imperial Russian Fabergé Eggs Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Patty Lenza   305-0875   
    This illustrated presentation by Marina Forbes focuses on the life and remarkable work of Russian master jeweler and artist, Peter Carl Fabergé. The program features a photo-tour of Fabergé collections at the Constantine Palace in St. Petersburg and from major museums and private collectors around the world. Explore the important role of egg painting in Russian culture and the development of this major Russian art form from a traditional craft to the level of exquisite fine art under the patronage of the tsars. Forbes also discusses the fascinating history of these eggs, their role in the dramatic events of the last decades of Romanov rule in Russia, and in the years following the Bolshevik Revolution.
    Location: St. Elizabeth Seton Church Basement, 190 Meetinghouse Rd., Bedford
Wednesday March 16, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 9:30 AM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Anne Krantz   673-9684   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: Messiah Lutheran Church, 303 Rte. 101, Amherst
Spacer Image Spacer Image Spacer Image Spacer Image
Spacer Image
Spacer Image
Thursday March 17, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carol Brock   547-2730   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: Francestown Town Offices (In Back), 27 Main St., Francestown
Wednesday March 30, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Witches, Pop Culture, and the Past Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Barbara Tosiano   926-3682   
    "Hang her!" cries the raucous spectator. In 1692, nineteen people were executed in Salem and hundreds imprisoned during a witch hunt we still discuss today. Robin DeRosa explains that when Salem tells its witch stories, history, tourism, and performance collide, and "truth," both moral and macabre, vies with spooky thrills for its authentic place in history.
    Location: Hampton Falls Free Library, 7 Drinkwater Rd., Hampton Falls
Thursday April 7, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Traveling Entertainer Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Merrimack Public Library Adult Services   424-5021   
    Musical humorist Charles Ross Taggart grew up in Topsham, Vermont, going on to perform in various lyceum and Chautauqua circuits all across the country for over 40 years starting in 1895. A fiddler, piano player, comedian, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 40 recordings on various labels, as well as appearing in an early talking movie four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of Taggart's career, c. 1936, sharing recollections on his life, with some live fiddling and humorous sketches interspersed in this living history program.
    Location: Merrimack Public Library, 470 Daniel Webster Hwy, Merrimack
Tuesday April 12, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Gandhi: The Man and his Teaching Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Friends of the Hampstead Public Library   329-6411   
    Mohandas Gandhi, one of the most influential and unusual world leaders of the 20th century, argued that there was no difference between personal and political morality. His method of non-violent resistance attracted millions of followers in India and around the world. Through fasting, organizing marches, and disobeying British laws he thought were unjust, he led India to freedom from colonial rule and inspired other leaders such as Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King. Donald Johnson examines the life and ideas of the man who believed that we cannot destroy ideas by killing the people who hold them.
    Location: Hampstead Public Library, 9 Mary E. Clark Dr., Hampstead
Wednesday April 13, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Chamberlin Free Public Library   878-1105   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Chamberlin Free Public Library, 46 Main St., Greenville
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Wacky Songs that Made Us Laugh Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Newton Historical Society   382-7574   
    Popular songs with humorous lyrics have kept us laughing since Colonial times. We need comic relief, and songs provide some of the best (sometimes unintentionally). Excerpts from hilarious songs help chart the evolution of musical humor from the 1920s to the 1980s. Selections poke fun at WW II enemies, diets, television, sex, Christmas, summer camp, religion, and many other aspects of life. Laugh as you recall wacky moments from the past and discover new ones with Calvin Knickerbocker.
    Location: Newton Town Hall, 2 Town Hall Rd., Newton
Thursday April 14, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 1:00 PM The Other Side of the Midnight Ride: A Visit with Rachel Revere Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Lee Arthur   964-6281   
    This living history program by Joan Gatturna tells a remarkable story of tea, trouble and revolution related by the woman who rode through life with Paul Revere. Rachel Revere tells of the Boston Tea Party, the Midnight Ride and the Siege of Boston. See these events through the eyes of a woman who engineered the escape of her family from occupied Boston and smuggled money to the Sons of Liberty. Meet the woman who kept the home fires burning while her husband fanned the flames of Revolution!
    Location: Rye Congregational Church, 580 Washington Rd., Rye
 
misc_none 2:30 PM Margaret Bourke-White, America's Eyes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sue Belanger   229-1266   
    Did you know that photographer Margaret Bourke-White had to make Stalin laugh to get his picture, and she was told by Patton to hide his jowls? Letters and tender WWII-era V-mails found at Syracuse University form the basis for this living history program. Sally Matson's lifetime in theatre began with acting and directing at Northwestern University, and her fascination with history provides the audience with an entertaining lesson.
    Location: Tad's Place Cultural Arts Ctr. (Heritage Heights), 149 East Side Dr., Concord
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Martha Fowler   330-3099   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: Rochester Historical Society Museum, 58 Hanson St., Rochester
Friday April 15, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 10:15 AM I Can't Die But Once - Harriet Tubman's Civil War Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Gayle Hylen   659-2422   
    Gwendolyn Quezaire-Presutti's characterization of Harriet Tubman is a lucid, well-researched biography about the remarkable life of an enduring warrior. As Harriet Tubman, she weaves a tale of truth, pain, courage and determination in the quagmire of racial exploitation. The United States Government enlisted Tubman as a scout and spy for the Union cause and she battled courageously behind enemy lines during the Civil War, but Tubman is best known for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad. Though she is one of the most famous women in our nation's history, we have come to know her life through fictionalized biographies written for school children. Quezaire-Presutti separates reality from myth to reconstruct a richer and far more accurate historical account of Tubman's life. THERE WILL BE COFFEE & CONVERSATION PRIOR TO THE PROGRAM BEGINNING AT 9 AM, A SHORT BUSINESS MEETING AT 9:45 AM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 10:00 AM.
    Location: Community Church of Durham, 17 Main St., Durham
Saturday April 16, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 2:00 PM Cows and Communities: How the Lowly Bovine Has Nurtured New Hampshire Through Four Centuries Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Susan Maclennan   868-2628   
    Cattle were essential to the survival of the earliest New Hampshire settlements, and their contributions have been central to the life and culture of the state ever since. From providing human dietary sustenance to basic motive power for agriculture, forestry and transport, bovines have had a deep and enduring bond with their keepers, one that lingers today and is a vital part of the iconography of rural New Hampshire, even as dairy farming becomes ever more reliant on intensive modern science and technology. Where are New Hampshire's cows today and what are are they doing? Steve Taylor provides answers -- some will prove surprising.
    Location: Durham Public Library, 49 Madbury Rd., Durham
Tuesday April 19, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Anita Creager   424-5084   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: John O'Leary Adult Community Ctr., 5 Church St., Merrimack
Spacer Image Spacer Image Spacer Image Spacer Image
Spacer Image
Spacer Image
Wednesday April 20, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 10:00 AM The Other Side of the Midnight Ride: A Visit with Rachel Revere Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Carol Smith   673-2250   
    This living history program by Joan Gatturna tells a remarkable story of tea, trouble and revolution related by the woman who rode through life with Paul Revere. Rachel Revere tells of the Boston Tea Party, the Midnight Ride and the Siege of Boston. See these events through the eyes of a woman who engineered the escape of her family from occupied Boston and smuggled money to the Sons of Liberty. Meet the woman who kept the home fires burning while her husband fanned the flames of Revolution!
    Location: Messiah Lutheran Church, 303 Rte. 101, Amherst
Thursday April 21, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: David Moody   835-7900   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Third Congregational Church, 14 River St., Alstead
 
misc_none 7:30 PM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sharon Howe   465-3935   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: Lawrence Barn, 28 Depot Rd., Hollis
Tuesday May 3, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Barbara Rimkunas   778-2335   
    Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.
    Location: Exeter Town Hall, 9 Front St., Exeter
Friday May 6, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM A Night of Music with Two Old Friends Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Jean Latham   382-5843   
    Over the centuries immigrants from the British Isles have come to the Americas bringing with them their musical styles and tastes as well as their instruments. With the concertina, bodhran, mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo, Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast sing and play this traditional Celtic music, but they also perform American country music in the way it was conceived in the early twentieth century. Through stories, songs and instrumental melodies, they demonstrate how old time American mountain tunes are often derived directly from the songs of the Irish, yet are influenced by other cultural groups to create a new American sound.
    Location: First Baptist Church, 122 Main St., Plaistow
Monday May 9, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 2:00 PM A Soldier's Mother Tells Her Story Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Ruslyn Vear   673-2288   
    Speaking as Betsey Phelps, the mother of a Union soldier from Amherst, New Hampshire who died heroically at the Battle of Gettysburg, Sharon Wood offers an informative and sensitive reflection on that sacrifice from a mother's perspective. Wood blends the Phelps boy's story with those of other men who left their New Hampshire homes to fight for the Union cause and of the families who supported them on the home front.
    Location: Amherst Public Library, 14 Main St., Amherst
 
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Stuart Hodgeman   477-2844   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Cornish Town Office Bldg (Upstairs)., 488 Town House Rd., Cornish
Tuesday May 10, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 3:00 PM Margaret Bourke-White, America's Eyes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Mary Pease   465-3501   
    Did you know that photographer Margaret Bourke-White had to make Stalin laugh to get his picture, and she was told by Patton to hide his jowls? Letters and tender WWII-era V-mails found at Syracuse University form the basis for this living history program. Sally Matson's lifetime in theatre began with acting and directing at Northwestern University, and her fascination with history provides the audience with an entertaining lesson.
    Location: Lawrence Barn, 28 Depot Rd., Hollis
Thursday May 12, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM (Not So) Elementary, My Dear Watson: The Popularity of Sherlock Holmes Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Wiggin Memorial Library   772-4346   
    The recent spate of Sherlock Holmes movies, television shows, and literary adaptations indicate the Great Detective is alive and well in the 21st century. Holmes is the most portrayed literary character of all time, with over 230 film versions alone in several different languages. Over the past century, Sherlockians created societies like the Baker Street Irregulars, wrote articles sussing out the "sources" of Doyle's works, and, most recently, developed an entire online world of Holmesian fan fiction. Sherlock Holmes is now a multi-million dollar industry. Why is Sherlock Holmes so popular? Ann McClellan's presentation explores the origins of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective and tracks his incarnations in literature, film, advertising, and modern media in order to crack the case of the most popular detective.
    Location: Wiggin Memorial Library, 10 Bunker Hill Ave., Stratham
Wednesday May 18, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 1:00 PM A Night of Music with Two Old Friends Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Caroline Gosse   968-3838   
    Over the centuries immigrants from the British Isles have come to the Americas bringing with them their musical styles and tastes as well as their instruments. With the concertina, bodhran, mandolin, octave mandolin, guitar, and banjo, Emery Hutchins and Jim Prendergast sing and play this traditional Celtic music, but they also perform American country music in the way it was conceived in the early twentieth century. Through stories, songs and instrumental melodies, they demonstrate how old time American mountain tunes are often derived directly from the songs of the Irish, yet are influenced by other cultural groups to create a new American sound.
    Location: St. Marks Church (Sherrill Hall), 18 Highland St., Ashland
 
misc_none 7:00 PM George Washington Spied Here: Spies and Spying in the American Revolutionary War (1775 - 1783) Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Bill Earnshaw   472-3866   
    Based on recently discovered historical materials and recent books, this program by Douglas Wheeler is an inquiry into the life and death of America's first spy, the patriot-martyr, Nathan Hale, of Coventry, Connecticut. Wheeler takes audiences on a journey through the spy world of the Culper Spy Ring of New York, Long Island and Connecticut, the most secret of the American spy rings and the most successful in getting useful intelligence to General George Washington beginning in 1778, two years after Hale's tragic execution by the British. The Father of our country was also our first Intelligence Chief. The program is illustrated with images of the main places and dramatis personae of this unusual network of patriot secret agents and couriers.
    Location: Bedford Public Library, 3 Meetinghouse Rd., Bedford
Thursday May 19, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire’s Long Love-Hate Relationship with Its Agricultural Fairs Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Adele Hale   547-3403   
    The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam, and other "scandalous dimensions" that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint. Steve Taylor will discuss the ups and downs of the fairs down through years and how public affection for rural traditions helps them survive in contemporary times.
    Location: Stephenson Memorial Library, 761 Forest Road, Greenfield
Spacer Image Spacer Image Spacer Image Spacer Image
Spacer Image
Spacer Image
 
misc_none 8:00 PM That Reminds Me of a Story Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sharon Howe   465-3935   
    Stories speak to us of community. They hold our history and reflect our identity. Rebecca Rule has made it her mission over the last 20 years to collect stories of New Hampshire, especially those that reflect what's special about this rocky old place. She'll tell some of those stories - her favorites are the funny ones - and invite audience members to contribute a few stories of their own. POTLUCK DINNER AND ANNUAL MEETING AT 7:00 PM WITH PROGRAM TO FOLLOW AT 8:00 PM
    Location: Lawrence Barn, 28 Depot Rd., Hollis
Tuesday May 24, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Vanished Veterans - NH's Civil War Monuments and Memorials Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Erin Apostolos   279-4303   
    From Seabrook to Colebrook, Berlin to Hinsdale, New Hampshire's towns, individuals and veterans organizations erected a fascinating assortment of memorials to The War of the Rebellion. Beginning with obelisks of the 1860s and continuing to re-mastered works of the 21st century, historian George Morrison presents a diverse selection of New Hampshire's commemorations.
    Location: Meredith Public Library, 91 Main St., Meredith
Wednesday May 25, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Denise Grimse   436-8548   
    Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.
    Location: Weeks Public Library, 36 Post Rd., Greenland
Thursday June 9, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM The Making of Strawbery Banke Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Martha Fowler   330-3099   
    Local legend says Strawbery Banke Museum began when a Portsmouth librarian gave a rousing speech in 1957. The backstory, however, is richly complex. This is a dramatic tale of economics, urban renewal, immigration, and historic architecture in New Hampshire's only seaport. J. Dennis Robinson, author of an award-winning "biography" of the 10-acre Strawbery Banke campus, shares the history of "America's oldest neighborhood." Tapping into private letters, unpublished records, and personal interviews, Robinson explores the politics of preservation. Using colorful and historic illustrations, the author looks candidly at mistakes made and lessons learned in this grassroots success story.
    Location: Rochester Historical Society Museum, 58 Hanson St., Rochester
Saturday June 18, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 4:00 PM Brewing in New Hampshire: An Informal History of Beer in the Granite State Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Joy B. Nowell   938-6054   
    Glenn Knoblock explores the fascinating history of New Hampshire's beer and ale brewing industry from Colonial days, when it was home- and tavern-based, to today's modern breweries and brew pubs. Unusual and rare photos and advertisements document this changing industry and the state's earliest brewers, including the renowned Frank Jones. A number of lesser-known brewers and breweries that operated in the state are also discussed, including the only brewery owned and operated by a woman before the modern era. Illustrations present evidence of society's changing attitudes towards beer and alcohol consumption over the years. Whether you're a beer connoisseur or a "tea-totaler", this lecture will be enjoyed by adults of all ages.
    Location: Center Meeting House, 927 Rte. 103 (intersection of Rte 103 & Rte 103A), Newbury
Tuesday June 21, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM World War Two New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Erin Apostolos   279-4303   
    This documentary tells the story of life in New Hampshire during the Second World War. Through interviews, historic news film, photos, and radio reports from the battlefields, this documentary and discussion facilitated by John Gfroerer chronicles how a nation, a state, and the citizens of New Hampshire mobilized for war.
    Location: Meredith Public Library, 91 Main St., Meredith
Monday July 11, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Poor Houses and Town Farms: The Hard Row for Paupers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Tom Talpey   495-3284   
    From its earliest settlements New Hampshire has struggled with issues surrounding the treatment of its poor. The early Northeastern colonies followed the lead of England's 1601 Poor Law, which imposed compulsory taxes for maintenance of the poor but made no distinction between the "vagrant, vicious poor" and the helpless, and honest poor. This confusion persisted for generations and led directly to establishment in most of the state's towns of alms houses and poor farms and, later, county institutions which would collectively come to form a dark chapter in New Hampshire history. Steve Taylor will examine how paupers were treated in these facilities and how reformers eventually succeeded in closing them down.
    Location: Camp Morgan Lodge, 339 Millen Pond Rd., Washington
Thursday July 14, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire’s Long Love-Hate Relationship with Its Agricultural Fairs Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Lisa Rothman   487-3867   
    The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam, and other "scandalous dimensions" that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint. Steve Taylor will discuss the ups and downs of the fairs down through years and how public affection for rural traditions helps them survive in contemporary times.
    Location: Community Church of New Boston, 2 Meetinghouse Hill Rd., New Boston
Tuesday July 19, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Sports, Meritocracy, and Democracy in the Ancient and Modern Worlds Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Merrimack Public Library Reference Services   424-5021   
    Paul Christesen's program explores the connections among sports, meritocracy, and democracy. Although the idea that sports promote democracy is widely held, social scientists have for the most part argued that sports do exactly the opposite, making it easier for the rich and powerful members of society to hold onto their privileges. Christesen makes the case that sports do indeed promote democracy by using some basic sociological concepts to show how sports affect athletes and spectators and by looking at historical examples of societies in which sports were regularly and seriously played by large numbers of people. Sports are not a miracle cure-all, and they can have negative effects, but, he argues, overall they seem to help make stable democratic societies possible.
    Location: Merrimack Public Library, 470 Daniel Webster Hwy, Merrimack
Tuesday August 9, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire’s Long Love-Hate Relationship with Its Agricultural Fairs Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Beverly Glynn   893-8882   
    The first agricultural fair in North America was held in what is now Londonderry in 1722, and it would become a wildly popular event lasting for generations until it came to be so dominated by gambling, flim-flam, and other "scandalous dimensions" that the legislature revoked its charter in 1850. But fairs have always had strong supporters and eventually the state came around to appropriating modest sums to help them succeed. Temperance groups and others would continue to attack the fairs on moral grounds and their close connection to horse racing was a chronic flashpoint. Steve Taylor will discuss the ups and downs of the fairs down through years and how public affection for rural traditions helps them survive in contemporary times.
    Location: Salem Historical Museum, 310 Main St., Salem
Thursday August 25, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Nancy Hartford   225-6496   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Pierce Manse, 14 Horseshoe Pond Lane, Concord
Sunday August 28, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 3:00 PM Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Newmarket Historical Society   659-3289   
    Drawing on research from her book, Moved and Seconded: Town Meeting in New Hampshire, the Present, the Past, and the Future, Rebecca Rule regales audiences with stories of the rituals, traditions and history of town meeting, including the perennial characters, the literature, the humor, and the wisdom of this uniquely New England institution.
    Location: Stone School Museum, Granite Street, Newmarket
Spacer Image Spacer Image Spacer Image Spacer Image
Spacer Image
Spacer Image
Thursday September 8, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Discovering New England Stone Walls Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Lisa Rothman   487-3867   
    Why are we so fascinated with stone walls? Kevin Gardner, author of The Granite Kiss, explains how and why New England came to acquire its thousands of miles of stone walls, the ways in which they and other dry stone structures were built, how their styles emerged and changed over time and their significance to the famous New England landscape. Along the way, Kevin occupies himself building a miniature wall or walls on a tabletop, using tiny stones from a five-gallon bucket.
    Location: Community Church of New Boston, 2 Meetinghouse Hill Rd., New Boston
Thursday September 15, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Runaway Wives: When Colonial Marriages Failed Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Margaret Ladd   272-4967   
    When 18th century wives tired of the marriage contract, they could run, but they could not hide. Husbands chased them down via newspaper ads, effectively removing their sources of credit and income. In the vocabulary of the war between the sexes, one reads of surprisingly enduring economic and social barriers to runaway wives. Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores this Colonial era challenge in this illustrated program.
    Location: Piermont Old Church Building, 130 Rte. 10, Piermont
Monday September 19, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 2:15 AM Banjos, Bones, and Ballads Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Cathy Litchfield   229-1185   
    Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.
    Location: Havenwood Auditorium, 33 Christian Ave., Concord
Tuesday September 20, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 6:00 PM Banjos, Bones, and Ballads Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Tricia Ryden   772-4346   
    Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner.
    Location: Wiggin Memorial Library, 10 Bunker Hill Ave., Stratham
 
misc_none 6:30 PM The U.S. Supreme Court: How Does It Operate? Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Erin Apostolos   279-4303   
    In the 20th century the U.S. Supreme Court came to be a powerful force in modern society. Richard Hesse discusses how its members are chosen and how it operates. Explore familiar examples of historical and contemporary debates over social policy and take a more careful look at this peculiarly "anti-democratic" institution.
    Location: Meredith Public Library, 91 Main St., Meredith
Wednesday September 21, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM Liberty Is Our Motto!: Songs and Stories of the Hutchinson Family Singers Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Sally Woodman   382-7574   
    The year is 1876, and New Hampshire's own John Hutchinson sings and tells about his famous musical family "straight from the horse's mouth." Originally from Milford, NH, the Hutchinson Family Singers were among America's most notable musical entertainers for much of the mid-19th century. They achieved international recognition with songs advancing social reform and political causes such as abolition, temperance, women's suffrage, and the Lincoln presidential campaign of 1860. In this living history program, Steve Blunt portrays John Hutchinson. He tells the Hutchinsons' story and shares their music with lyrics provided. Audience members are invited to sing along on "The Old Granite State," "Get Off the Track," "Tenting on the Old Campground," and more.
    Location: Newton Town Hall, 2 Town Hall Rd., Newton
 
misc_none 8:00 PM Banjos, Bones, and Ballads Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Bill Earnshaw   472-3866   
    Traditional songs, rich in local history and a sense of place, present the latest news from the distant past. They help us to interpret present-day life with an understanding of the working people who built our country. Tavern songs, banjo tunes, 18th century New England hymns, sailor songs, and humorous stories about traditional singers and their songs highlight this informative program by Jeff Warner. THE BEDFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY WILL HOLD IT'S ANNUAL MEETING AT 6:30 PM WITH SOCIAL TIME, 7:00 PM IS A CATERED DINNER WITH MEETING. PROGRAM WILL FOLLOW AT 8:00 PM.
    Location: Bedford Town Hall, 1 Meetinghouse Rd., Bedford
Wednesday September 28, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 6:30 PM A Woman That Keeps Good Orders: Women, Tavern Keeping, and Public Approval Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Denise Grimse   436-8548   
    Government regulations, licensing, handling drunks, controlling the flow of information --why would the Colonial-era government allow women to run a tavern? When her husband died in 1736, Ann Jose Harvey became the owner of a prominent Portsmouth tavern and sole guardian of seven small children. For at least twenty years, Harvey ran the increasingly prosperous establishment. Using documents related to Harvey's venue, Marcia Schmidt Blaine explores the world of female tavern keepers. A tavern was potentially the most disruptive spot in town. Why would a woman want to keep one?
    Location: Weeks Public Library, 36 Post Rd., Greenland
Thursday October 13, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM New England's Colonial Meetinghouses and their Impact on American Society Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Helga Mueller   272-4967   
    New England's colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities. Using photographs of the few surviving "mint condition" meetinghouses as illustrations, Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture.
    Location: Piermont Old Church Building, 130 Rte. 10, Piermont
Thursday October 27, 2016 Go To Top
misc_none 7:00 PM New Hampshire's Grange Movement: Its Rise, Triumphs and Decline Remind Me about this Event   Tell a Friend
    Contact: Nancy Hartford   225-6496   
    Much of rural New Hampshire in the late 19th century was locked in a downward spiral of population decline, abandonment of farms, reversion of cleared land to forest and widespread feelings of melancholy and loss. The development of the Grange movement in the 1880s and 1890s was aided greatly by hunger for social interaction, entertainment and mutual support. As membership surged it became a major force in policymaking in Concord, and its agenda aligned closely with the Progressive politics that swept the state in early 20th century. Many Grange initiatives became law, placing the state at the leading edge in several areas of reform. Steve Taylor analyzes the rapid social and economic changes that would eventually force the steep decline of the once-powerful movement.
    Location: Pierce Manse, 14 Horseshoe Pond Lane, Concord
Spacer Image Spacer Image Spacer Image Spacer Image
Spacer Image
Events Displayed = 58


Go To Top

Today is Saturday February 13, 2016
1054 Visits



EventKeeper Home Page Plymouth Rocket Home Page Footer Text [ ANSWER KEEPER ]          [ EDITOR LOGIN ]
OBE



[Weekly Calendar View]     [Monthly Calendar View]     [Yearly Calendar View]