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The Golden Age of Television: What Made the 1950s So Special for American TV with Brian Rose

Tuesday November 27, 2018
2:00 PM until 3:00 PM


American television was all set to launch in the late 1930s, but its progress was interrupted by the start of World War II. Finally, by the end of the 1940s, NBC and CBS began broadcasting to their east coast affiliates. They offered viewers a wide variety of programs: situation comedies, vaudeville-style revues, and most impressively, live original dramas. Within a few years, these anthology programs, like Kraft Theatre and Ford Theatre launched the careers of soon-to-be famous directors like Arthur Penn and John Frankenheimer, actors like Paul Newman and James Dean, and playwrights like Paddy Chayevsky and Rod Serling.

But by the end of the 1950s, the era of live TV "theater" was over. So too was New York City as a center of TV production. This presentation will look at the forces that made this "golden age" such an intriguing chapter in TV history and why it was so short-lived (including brief examinations of blacklisting and the TV quiz show scandals).

Brian Rose is a Professor in the Department of Communication and Media Studies at Fordham University, where he teaches courses in film and television history, theory, and economics. He has written several books on television history and cultural programming, as well as two anthologies on television genres.

Registration suggested beginning Monday, September 17 by calling 466-8055, ext. 208/254 or register online.

 


Location: Main Library Community Room
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This page last updated : EK/TK EAGLE 2018.10.26 - 12:30 PM
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