Add this Event to Calendar 02/18/2020 12:00 AM 03/01/2020 12:00 AM Art Exhibit: The Ceramic Art of Meghan Burke

The Ceramic Art of Meghan Burke will be on display for the month of February.  A detailed list of items and prices is available at the Circulation Desk.  

Meghan Burke, from Manasquan, NJ, graduated in 2015 from St. Joseph's University with a Bachelors of Art degree before traveling to several art residencies across the U.S., including: Watershed Center for Ceramic Arts, Byrdcliffe Arts Guild, and Elsewhere Studios. She is an avid animal lover, nature enthusiast, and novice gardener. After beginning her ceramics career as a sculptor, she found a love of functional pottery, using her passion for plants and flowers to inspire her hand-pinched and coiled pottery. She found her true fascination with wood-firing at Touchstone Center for Crafts, where she worked as the ceramics studio technician for two years. She now fires and finishes her work completely in a wood kiln.  Meghan currently resides in Pittsburgh, PA and works out of a studio in Polish Hill. Find more information about Meghan and her work on instagram @meghanburkestudio.

Wood kilns: The process of using wood to fire and finish pottery has been around since the 5th century. It is a primitive firing method and the results vary based on clay body, type of wood, placement of pots in the kiln, and firing time/techniques. Each piece of pottery that comes out of a wood kiln is a unique mark in time based on what has occurred during the firing. This means no piece is exactly the same; the flames and wood ash create different surfaces.  

When firing a wood kiln, there are usually groups or teams of people. Each shift lasts several hours and one is stoking or adding wood to the kiln continuously for several days. The kiln is solely fueled by wood and the kiln heats up the ash and flames move throughout the kiln, pushing its way through the pots that have been loaded inside, leaving its mark on them. As the kiln reaches its desired temperature of about 2,400 degrees Fahrenheit, the pots inside glow and the wood ash hits the pottery and melts onto them, creating the surface and glaze. Wood firing is a physically demanding process, but the results can be extremely rewarding. Each pot is a unique story from the kiln. 

Eastern Branch